Will tree euphorbias (Euphorbia tetragona and Euphorbia triangularis) survive under the impact of black rhinoceros (Bicornis diceros minor) browsing in the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa?

L.C. Heilmann, K. de Jong, P.C. Lent, W.F. de Boer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of black rhinoceros (Bicornis diceros minor) on the tree euphorbias Euphorbia tetragona and Euphorbia triangularis was studied in the Great Fish River Reserve, South Africa. Black rhinoceros pushed over about 5¿7% of the trees in a 2-month period. There was a preference of rhinos for smaller trees, however this preference did not guarantee euphorbia survival in the larger size classes. This means that tree euphorbias could very well disappear from all areas accessible to rhinos. Rhino feeding choices were correlated with higher plant moisture content, higher nitrogen content, and a higher digestibility
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-94
JournalAfrican Journal of Ecology
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • manyara-national-park
  • acacia-tortilis
  • game reserve
  • elephant
  • herbivory
  • tanzania
  • ecology
  • decline
  • giraffe
  • damage

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