Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp.

Wilma C. Hazeleger*, Wilma F. Jacobs-Reitsma, Peter H.C. Lina, Albert G. De Boer, Thijs Bosch, Angela H.A.M. Van Hoek, Rijkelt R. Beumer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The transmission cycles of the foodborne pathogens Campylobacter and Salmonella are not fully elucidated. Knowledge of these cycles may help reduce the transmission of these pathogens to humans. Methodology/principal findings The presence of campylobacters and salmonellas was examined in 631 fresh fecal samples of wild insectivorous bats using a specially developed method for the simultaneous isolation of low numbers of these pathogens in small-sized fecal samples ( 0.1 g). Salmonella was not detected in the feces samples, but thermotolerant campylobacters were confirmed in 3% (n = 17) of the bats examined and these pathogens were found in six different bat species, at different sites, in different ecosystems during the whole flying season of bats. Molecular typing of the 17 isolated strains indicated C. jejuni (n = 9), C. coli (n = 7) and C. lari (n = 1), including genotypes also found in humans, wildlife, environmental samples and poultry. Six strains showed unique sequence types. Conclusion/significance This study shows that insectivorous bats are not only carriers of viral pathogens, but they can also be relevant for the transmission of bacterial pathogens. Bats should be considered as carriers and potential transmitters of Campylobacter and, where possible, contact between bats (bat feces) and food or feed should be avoided.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0190647
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Campylobacter
Pathogens
Chiroptera
Salmonella
pathogens
Infectious Disease Transmission
Feces
Poultry
feces
Molecular Typing
sampling
Ecosystems
Transmitters
Larus
isolation techniques
food pathogens
Ecosystem
wildlife
poultry
flight

Cite this

Hazeleger, W. C., Jacobs-Reitsma, W. F., Lina, P. H. C., De Boer, A. G., Bosch, T., Van Hoek, A. H. A. M., & Beumer, R. R. (2018). Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp. PLoS ONE, 13(1), [e0190647]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190647
Hazeleger, Wilma C. ; Jacobs-Reitsma, Wilma F. ; Lina, Peter H.C. ; De Boer, Albert G. ; Bosch, Thijs ; Van Hoek, Angela H.A.M. ; Beumer, Rijkelt R. / Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp. In: PLoS ONE. 2018 ; Vol. 13, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background The transmission cycles of the foodborne pathogens Campylobacter and Salmonella are not fully elucidated. Knowledge of these cycles may help reduce the transmission of these pathogens to humans. Methodology/principal findings The presence of campylobacters and salmonellas was examined in 631 fresh fecal samples of wild insectivorous bats using a specially developed method for the simultaneous isolation of low numbers of these pathogens in small-sized fecal samples ( 0.1 g). Salmonella was not detected in the feces samples, but thermotolerant campylobacters were confirmed in 3{\%} (n = 17) of the bats examined and these pathogens were found in six different bat species, at different sites, in different ecosystems during the whole flying season of bats. Molecular typing of the 17 isolated strains indicated C. jejuni (n = 9), C. coli (n = 7) and C. lari (n = 1), including genotypes also found in humans, wildlife, environmental samples and poultry. Six strains showed unique sequence types. Conclusion/significance This study shows that insectivorous bats are not only carriers of viral pathogens, but they can also be relevant for the transmission of bacterial pathogens. Bats should be considered as carriers and potential transmitters of Campylobacter and, where possible, contact between bats (bat feces) and food or feed should be avoided.",
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Hazeleger, WC, Jacobs-Reitsma, WF, Lina, PHC, De Boer, AG, Bosch, T, Van Hoek, AHAM & Beumer, RR 2018, 'Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp.', PLoS ONE, vol. 13, no. 1, e0190647. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190647

Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp. / Hazeleger, Wilma C.; Jacobs-Reitsma, Wilma F.; Lina, Peter H.C.; De Boer, Albert G.; Bosch, Thijs; Van Hoek, Angela H.A.M.; Beumer, Rijkelt R.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 13, No. 1, e0190647, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Van Hoek, Angela H.A.M.

AU - Beumer, Rijkelt R.

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N2 - Background The transmission cycles of the foodborne pathogens Campylobacter and Salmonella are not fully elucidated. Knowledge of these cycles may help reduce the transmission of these pathogens to humans. Methodology/principal findings The presence of campylobacters and salmonellas was examined in 631 fresh fecal samples of wild insectivorous bats using a specially developed method for the simultaneous isolation of low numbers of these pathogens in small-sized fecal samples ( 0.1 g). Salmonella was not detected in the feces samples, but thermotolerant campylobacters were confirmed in 3% (n = 17) of the bats examined and these pathogens were found in six different bat species, at different sites, in different ecosystems during the whole flying season of bats. Molecular typing of the 17 isolated strains indicated C. jejuni (n = 9), C. coli (n = 7) and C. lari (n = 1), including genotypes also found in humans, wildlife, environmental samples and poultry. Six strains showed unique sequence types. Conclusion/significance This study shows that insectivorous bats are not only carriers of viral pathogens, but they can also be relevant for the transmission of bacterial pathogens. Bats should be considered as carriers and potential transmitters of Campylobacter and, where possible, contact between bats (bat feces) and food or feed should be avoided.

AB - Background The transmission cycles of the foodborne pathogens Campylobacter and Salmonella are not fully elucidated. Knowledge of these cycles may help reduce the transmission of these pathogens to humans. Methodology/principal findings The presence of campylobacters and salmonellas was examined in 631 fresh fecal samples of wild insectivorous bats using a specially developed method for the simultaneous isolation of low numbers of these pathogens in small-sized fecal samples ( 0.1 g). Salmonella was not detected in the feces samples, but thermotolerant campylobacters were confirmed in 3% (n = 17) of the bats examined and these pathogens were found in six different bat species, at different sites, in different ecosystems during the whole flying season of bats. Molecular typing of the 17 isolated strains indicated C. jejuni (n = 9), C. coli (n = 7) and C. lari (n = 1), including genotypes also found in humans, wildlife, environmental samples and poultry. Six strains showed unique sequence types. Conclusion/significance This study shows that insectivorous bats are not only carriers of viral pathogens, but they can also be relevant for the transmission of bacterial pathogens. Bats should be considered as carriers and potential transmitters of Campylobacter and, where possible, contact between bats (bat feces) and food or feed should be avoided.

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Hazeleger WC, Jacobs-Reitsma WF, Lina PHC, De Boer AG, Bosch T, Van Hoek AHAM et al. Wild, insectivorous bats might be carriers of Campylobacter spp. PLoS ONE. 2018 Jan 1;13(1). e0190647. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0190647