Why a ‘light’ product package should not be light blue: Effects of package colour on perceived healthiness and attractiveness of sugar- and fat- reduced products

I.O.J.M. Tijssen*, E.H. Zandstra, C. de Graaf, G. Jager

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Healthier foods (e.g. ‘light’ products with low fat or sugar content) often lead to lower hedonic evaluation and decreased satiating properties, putting these products at a sensory disadvantage compared to their regular counterparts. Nudging consumers towards healthy foods by making healthy foods more attractive may facilitate healthier food choices. Package colour communicates product properties and could be used to make a healthy product more attractive. Healthier alternatives are typically packaged in less vibrantly coloured, watered-down packages compared to their regular counterparts. Does this communicate the intended message?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-58
JournalFood Quality and Preference
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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