Variation in plant volatiles and attraction of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén)

T. Bukovinszky, R. Gols, M.A. Posthumus, L.E.M. Vet, J.C. van Lenteren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Differences in allelochemistry of plants may influence their ability to attract parasitoids.We studied responses of Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén), a parasitoid of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.), to inter- and intraspecific variation in odor blends of crucifers and a non-crucifer species. Uninfested Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea L. gemmifera), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.), a feral Brassica oleracea, and malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were compared for their attractivity to D. semiclausum in a Y-tube bioassay. Odors from all plants were more attractive to the parasitoid than clean air. However, tested against each other, parasitoids preferred the volatile blend from the three cruciferous species over that of malting barley.Wasps also discriminated between uninfested crucifers: mustard was as attractive as feral B. oleracea, and both were more attractive than Brussels sprout. Attractivity of uninfested plants was compared with that of plants infested by larvae of the host P. xylostella. Host-infested mustard and Brussels sprout were more attractive than uninfested conspecifics. Interestingly, the volatile blends of uninfested white mustard and infested Brussels sprout were equally attractive.We also compared the volatile composition of different plant sources by collecting headspace samples and analysing them with GC-MS. Similarities of volatile profiles were determined by hierarchic clustering and non-metric scaling based on the Horn-index. Due to the absence of several compounds in its blend, the volatile profile of barley showed dissimilarities from blends of crucifers. The odor profile of white mustard was distinctly different from the two Brassicaceae.Feral Brassica oleracea odor profile was different from infested Brussels sprout, but showed overlap with uninfested Brussels sprout. Odor blends from infested and uninfested Brussels sprout were similar, and mainly quantitative differences were found. D. semiclausum appears to discriminate based on subtle differences in volatile composition of odor blends from infested and uninfested plants
LanguageEnglish
Pages461-480
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Diadegma semiclausum
Brussels sprouts
Odors
Sinapis
parasitoid
odor
Hordeum
odors
Brassica oleracea
Sinapis alba subsp. alba
Brassicaceae
Brassica
Plutella xylostella
barley
Mustard Plant
malting barley
parasitoids
Wasps
interspecific variation
Moths

Keywords

  • enemy-free space
  • diaeretiella-rapae hymenoptera
  • brussels-sprouts plants
  • plutella-xylostella
  • host-plant
  • foraging behavior
  • diamondback moth
  • natural enemies
  • cabbage plants
  • rubecula hymenoptera

Cite this

@article{7a328901d0ae4d82a0d6330071f208b5,
title = "Variation in plant volatiles and attraction of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum (Hell{\'e}n)",
abstract = "Differences in allelochemistry of plants may influence their ability to attract parasitoids.We studied responses of Diadegma semiclausum (Hell{\'e}n), a parasitoid of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.), to inter- and intraspecific variation in odor blends of crucifers and a non-crucifer species. Uninfested Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea L. gemmifera), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.), a feral Brassica oleracea, and malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were compared for their attractivity to D. semiclausum in a Y-tube bioassay. Odors from all plants were more attractive to the parasitoid than clean air. However, tested against each other, parasitoids preferred the volatile blend from the three cruciferous species over that of malting barley.Wasps also discriminated between uninfested crucifers: mustard was as attractive as feral B. oleracea, and both were more attractive than Brussels sprout. Attractivity of uninfested plants was compared with that of plants infested by larvae of the host P. xylostella. Host-infested mustard and Brussels sprout were more attractive than uninfested conspecifics. Interestingly, the volatile blends of uninfested white mustard and infested Brussels sprout were equally attractive.We also compared the volatile composition of different plant sources by collecting headspace samples and analysing them with GC-MS. Similarities of volatile profiles were determined by hierarchic clustering and non-metric scaling based on the Horn-index. Due to the absence of several compounds in its blend, the volatile profile of barley showed dissimilarities from blends of crucifers. The odor profile of white mustard was distinctly different from the two Brassicaceae.Feral Brassica oleracea odor profile was different from infested Brussels sprout, but showed overlap with uninfested Brussels sprout. Odor blends from infested and uninfested Brussels sprout were similar, and mainly quantitative differences were found. D. semiclausum appears to discriminate based on subtle differences in volatile composition of odor blends from infested and uninfested plants",
keywords = "enemy-free space, diaeretiella-rapae hymenoptera, brussels-sprouts plants, plutella-xylostella, host-plant, foraging behavior, diamondback moth, natural enemies, cabbage plants, rubecula hymenoptera",
author = "T. Bukovinszky and R. Gols and M.A. Posthumus and L.E.M. Vet and {van Lenteren}, J.C.",
note = "2647",
year = "2005",
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language = "English",
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Variation in plant volatiles and attraction of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén). / Bukovinszky, T.; Gols, R.; Posthumus, M.A.; Vet, L.E.M.; van Lenteren, J.C.

In: Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 31, No. 3, 2005, p. 461-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Variation in plant volatiles and attraction of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén)

AU - Bukovinszky, T.

AU - Gols, R.

AU - Posthumus, M.A.

AU - Vet, L.E.M.

AU - van Lenteren, J.C.

N1 - 2647

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Differences in allelochemistry of plants may influence their ability to attract parasitoids.We studied responses of Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén), a parasitoid of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.), to inter- and intraspecific variation in odor blends of crucifers and a non-crucifer species. Uninfested Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea L. gemmifera), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.), a feral Brassica oleracea, and malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were compared for their attractivity to D. semiclausum in a Y-tube bioassay. Odors from all plants were more attractive to the parasitoid than clean air. However, tested against each other, parasitoids preferred the volatile blend from the three cruciferous species over that of malting barley.Wasps also discriminated between uninfested crucifers: mustard was as attractive as feral B. oleracea, and both were more attractive than Brussels sprout. Attractivity of uninfested plants was compared with that of plants infested by larvae of the host P. xylostella. Host-infested mustard and Brussels sprout were more attractive than uninfested conspecifics. Interestingly, the volatile blends of uninfested white mustard and infested Brussels sprout were equally attractive.We also compared the volatile composition of different plant sources by collecting headspace samples and analysing them with GC-MS. Similarities of volatile profiles were determined by hierarchic clustering and non-metric scaling based on the Horn-index. Due to the absence of several compounds in its blend, the volatile profile of barley showed dissimilarities from blends of crucifers. The odor profile of white mustard was distinctly different from the two Brassicaceae.Feral Brassica oleracea odor profile was different from infested Brussels sprout, but showed overlap with uninfested Brussels sprout. Odor blends from infested and uninfested Brussels sprout were similar, and mainly quantitative differences were found. D. semiclausum appears to discriminate based on subtle differences in volatile composition of odor blends from infested and uninfested plants

AB - Differences in allelochemistry of plants may influence their ability to attract parasitoids.We studied responses of Diadegma semiclausum (Hellén), a parasitoid of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.), to inter- and intraspecific variation in odor blends of crucifers and a non-crucifer species. Uninfested Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea L. gemmifera), white mustard (Sinapis alba L.), a feral Brassica oleracea, and malting barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were compared for their attractivity to D. semiclausum in a Y-tube bioassay. Odors from all plants were more attractive to the parasitoid than clean air. However, tested against each other, parasitoids preferred the volatile blend from the three cruciferous species over that of malting barley.Wasps also discriminated between uninfested crucifers: mustard was as attractive as feral B. oleracea, and both were more attractive than Brussels sprout. Attractivity of uninfested plants was compared with that of plants infested by larvae of the host P. xylostella. Host-infested mustard and Brussels sprout were more attractive than uninfested conspecifics. Interestingly, the volatile blends of uninfested white mustard and infested Brussels sprout were equally attractive.We also compared the volatile composition of different plant sources by collecting headspace samples and analysing them with GC-MS. Similarities of volatile profiles were determined by hierarchic clustering and non-metric scaling based on the Horn-index. Due to the absence of several compounds in its blend, the volatile profile of barley showed dissimilarities from blends of crucifers. The odor profile of white mustard was distinctly different from the two Brassicaceae.Feral Brassica oleracea odor profile was different from infested Brussels sprout, but showed overlap with uninfested Brussels sprout. Odor blends from infested and uninfested Brussels sprout were similar, and mainly quantitative differences were found. D. semiclausum appears to discriminate based on subtle differences in volatile composition of odor blends from infested and uninfested plants

KW - enemy-free space

KW - diaeretiella-rapae hymenoptera

KW - brussels-sprouts plants

KW - plutella-xylostella

KW - host-plant

KW - foraging behavior

KW - diamondback moth

KW - natural enemies

KW - cabbage plants

KW - rubecula hymenoptera

U2 - 10.1007/s10886-005-2019-4

DO - 10.1007/s10886-005-2019-4

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 461

EP - 480

JO - Journal of Chemical Ecology

T2 - Journal of Chemical Ecology

JF - Journal of Chemical Ecology

SN - 0098-0331

IS - 3

ER -