Vapor Extraction/Bioventing Sequential Treatment of Soil Contaminated with Volatile and SemiVolatile Hydrocarbon Mixtures

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A cost-effective removal strategy was studied in bench-scale columns that involved vapor extraction and bioventing sequential treatment of toluene- and decane-contaminated soil. The effect of operating mode on treatment performance was examined at a continuous air flow and consecutively at two different flow rates, and compared with an intermittent (pulse) flow rate. The two-rate flow was needed due to the inhibitory effect of toluene on indigenous microorganisms at above 75␘f the toluene saturation concentrations in the gas phase. About three times less air was required for toluene than for decane to achieve comparable removal efficiency at the constant flow. This air volume could be reduced, in the case of decane, by a factor of 1.6 and 2.9, at the two-rate and intermittent flow, respectively. A higher contribution of biodegradation to the overall removal of hydrocarbon will lower hydrocarbon concentrations in the off-gases to be treated. The relative concentration of decane did not exceed 60␘f the saturation concentration, indicating that the rate of volatilization limited its removal. When non-aqueous phase liquid was present, the air was almost fully saturated with toluene and its transport capacity was almost fully used. Thus, the remediation time could be reduced by increasing the flow rate without decreasing the efficient use of flushing air, defined as volume of air per mass of removed hydrocarbons.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-176
JournalBioremediation journal
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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