Utilization of seagrass habitats by juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay, Banten Province, Indonesia

S. Nuraini, E.C. Carballo, W.L.T. van Densen, M.A.M. Machiels, H.J. Lindeboom, L.A.J. Nagelkerke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coastal development in Banten Bay, Indonesia, decreased seagrass coverage to only 1.5% of its surface area. We investigated the importance of seagrass as habitat for juvenile groupers (Serranidae) and snappers (Lutjanidae), by performing beam trawl hauls on a weekly basis in two seagrass locations and one mudflat area, and monthly trawl hauls in three different microhabitats (dense, mixed and patchy seagrass) in one of the seagrass locations. We studied the effects of location and microhabitat, as well as temporal patterns (diel, weekly and monthly) on the probability of occurrence and abundance of the most abundant grouper (Orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides) and snapper (Russell¿s snapper, Lutjanus russellii). We found that both species were almost exclusively found in seagrass locations, with a preference for microhabitats of high complexity (dense and mixed microhabitats). L. russellii had a higher probability of catch and abundance during the night, most probably because of its ability to avoid the beam trawl during daytime sampling. In addition there was an effect of week and month on the presence and abundance of both species, but patterns were unclear, probably because of high fishing pressure on juvenile groupers and snappers by push net fishermen. Groupers and snappers mainly fed on abundant shrimps, and to a lesser extent on fish. Moreover, juveniles find protection against predators in seagrass, which confirmed the critical role of quantity and quality of seagrass areas for juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-98
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume591
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

snapper
grouper
seagrass
Indonesia
microhabitats
habitat
habitats
microhabitat
Epinephelus coioides
Lutjanidae
Serranidae
Lutjanus
fishermen
coastal development
province
surface area
shrimp
mudflat
predators
fishing

Keywords

  • unvegetated habitats
  • florida bay
  • fishes
  • recruitment
  • patterns
  • meadows
  • diel
  • abundance
  • selection
  • victoria

Cite this

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title = "Utilization of seagrass habitats by juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay, Banten Province, Indonesia",
abstract = "Coastal development in Banten Bay, Indonesia, decreased seagrass coverage to only 1.5{\%} of its surface area. We investigated the importance of seagrass as habitat for juvenile groupers (Serranidae) and snappers (Lutjanidae), by performing beam trawl hauls on a weekly basis in two seagrass locations and one mudflat area, and monthly trawl hauls in three different microhabitats (dense, mixed and patchy seagrass) in one of the seagrass locations. We studied the effects of location and microhabitat, as well as temporal patterns (diel, weekly and monthly) on the probability of occurrence and abundance of the most abundant grouper (Orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides) and snapper (Russell¿s snapper, Lutjanus russellii). We found that both species were almost exclusively found in seagrass locations, with a preference for microhabitats of high complexity (dense and mixed microhabitats). L. russellii had a higher probability of catch and abundance during the night, most probably because of its ability to avoid the beam trawl during daytime sampling. In addition there was an effect of week and month on the presence and abundance of both species, but patterns were unclear, probably because of high fishing pressure on juvenile groupers and snappers by push net fishermen. Groupers and snappers mainly fed on abundant shrimps, and to a lesser extent on fish. Moreover, juveniles find protection against predators in seagrass, which confirmed the critical role of quantity and quality of seagrass areas for juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay.",
keywords = "unvegetated habitats, florida bay, fishes, recruitment, patterns, meadows, diel, abundance, selection, victoria",
author = "S. Nuraini and E.C. Carballo and {van Densen}, W.L.T. and M.A.M. Machiels and H.J. Lindeboom and L.A.J. Nagelkerke",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1007/s10750-007-0786-3",
language = "English",
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pages = "85--98",
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Utilization of seagrass habitats by juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay, Banten Province, Indonesia. / Nuraini, S.; Carballo, E.C.; van Densen, W.L.T.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Lindeboom, H.J.; Nagelkerke, L.A.J.

In: Hydrobiologia, Vol. 591, No. 1, 2007, p. 85-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utilization of seagrass habitats by juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay, Banten Province, Indonesia

AU - Nuraini, S.

AU - Carballo, E.C.

AU - van Densen, W.L.T.

AU - Machiels, M.A.M.

AU - Lindeboom, H.J.

AU - Nagelkerke, L.A.J.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Coastal development in Banten Bay, Indonesia, decreased seagrass coverage to only 1.5% of its surface area. We investigated the importance of seagrass as habitat for juvenile groupers (Serranidae) and snappers (Lutjanidae), by performing beam trawl hauls on a weekly basis in two seagrass locations and one mudflat area, and monthly trawl hauls in three different microhabitats (dense, mixed and patchy seagrass) in one of the seagrass locations. We studied the effects of location and microhabitat, as well as temporal patterns (diel, weekly and monthly) on the probability of occurrence and abundance of the most abundant grouper (Orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides) and snapper (Russell¿s snapper, Lutjanus russellii). We found that both species were almost exclusively found in seagrass locations, with a preference for microhabitats of high complexity (dense and mixed microhabitats). L. russellii had a higher probability of catch and abundance during the night, most probably because of its ability to avoid the beam trawl during daytime sampling. In addition there was an effect of week and month on the presence and abundance of both species, but patterns were unclear, probably because of high fishing pressure on juvenile groupers and snappers by push net fishermen. Groupers and snappers mainly fed on abundant shrimps, and to a lesser extent on fish. Moreover, juveniles find protection against predators in seagrass, which confirmed the critical role of quantity and quality of seagrass areas for juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay.

AB - Coastal development in Banten Bay, Indonesia, decreased seagrass coverage to only 1.5% of its surface area. We investigated the importance of seagrass as habitat for juvenile groupers (Serranidae) and snappers (Lutjanidae), by performing beam trawl hauls on a weekly basis in two seagrass locations and one mudflat area, and monthly trawl hauls in three different microhabitats (dense, mixed and patchy seagrass) in one of the seagrass locations. We studied the effects of location and microhabitat, as well as temporal patterns (diel, weekly and monthly) on the probability of occurrence and abundance of the most abundant grouper (Orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides) and snapper (Russell¿s snapper, Lutjanus russellii). We found that both species were almost exclusively found in seagrass locations, with a preference for microhabitats of high complexity (dense and mixed microhabitats). L. russellii had a higher probability of catch and abundance during the night, most probably because of its ability to avoid the beam trawl during daytime sampling. In addition there was an effect of week and month on the presence and abundance of both species, but patterns were unclear, probably because of high fishing pressure on juvenile groupers and snappers by push net fishermen. Groupers and snappers mainly fed on abundant shrimps, and to a lesser extent on fish. Moreover, juveniles find protection against predators in seagrass, which confirmed the critical role of quantity and quality of seagrass areas for juvenile groupers and snappers in Banten Bay.

KW - unvegetated habitats

KW - florida bay

KW - fishes

KW - recruitment

KW - patterns

KW - meadows

KW - diel

KW - abundance

KW - selection

KW - victoria

U2 - 10.1007/s10750-007-0786-3

DO - 10.1007/s10750-007-0786-3

M3 - Article

VL - 591

SP - 85

EP - 98

JO - Hydrobiologia

JF - Hydrobiologia

SN - 0018-8158

IS - 1

ER -