Using hyperspectral remote sensing data for retrieving canopy water content

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Abstract

Canopy water content (CWC) is important for understanding functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Spectral derivatives at the slopes of the 970 nm and 1200 nm water absorption features offer good potential as estimators for CWC. An extensively grazed fen meadow is used as test site in this study. Results are compared with simulations with the PROSAIL radiative transfer model. The first derivative at the left slope of the feature at 970 nm is found to be highly correlated with CWC and the relationship corresponds to the one found with PROSAIL simulations. Use of the derivative over the 940 – 950 nm interval is suggested. In order to avoid interference with absorption by atmospheric water vapour, the potential of estimating CWC using the first derivative at the right slope of the 970 nm absorption feature is recommended. Correlations are a bit lower than those at the left slope, but better than those obtained with water band indices, as shown in previous studies. FieldSpec measurements show that one may use derivatives around the middle of the right slope within the interval between 1015 nm and 1050 nm.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings First Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS)
PublisherIEEE
Pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424446872
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventFirst Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS) -
Duration: 26 Aug 200928 Aug 2009

Workshop

WorkshopFirst Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS)
Period26/08/0928/08/09

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Clevers, J. G. P. W., & Kooistra, L. (2009). Using hyperspectral remote sensing data for retrieving canopy water content. In Proceedings First Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing: Evolution in Remote Sensing (WHISPERS) (pp. 4). IEEE.