Use of antioxidants to minimize the human health risk associated to mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in food

P. Vitaglione, V. Fogliano*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heterocyclic amines (HAs) are mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds formed in meat during cooking. Several efforts have been made to minimize the risk associated to HA human exposure. Supplementation with antioxidants is considered a promising measure to reduce HA exposure because of their ability as inhibitors of HA formation or as blocking/suppressing agents on HA biotransformation/metabolism. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge on the capability of synthetic and natural antioxidants to modulate HA-induced mutagenicity/carcinogenicity. Data show a general trend towards a reduction of HA formation both in model systems and in real foods as well as an effective modulation of biotransformation and metabolism. Phenolic compounds, particularly those from tea and olive oil, seem to be the most effective, although a great variability is observed because of the concentration-dependent pro- and antioxidant effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-199
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences
Volume802
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antioxidants
  • Food analysis
  • Heterocyclic aromatic amines
  • Reviews

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