Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients

Adrian Post*, Yusof Said, Antonio W. Gomes-Neto, Jennifer van der Krogt, Pim de Blaauw, Stefan P. Berger, Johanna M. Geleijnse, Karin Borgonjen, Else van den Berg, Harry van Goor, Gerald Rimbach, Ido P. Kema, Dimitrios Tsikas, Rebecca Heiner-Fokkema, Stephan J.L. Bakker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Taurine is a sulfur containing nutrient that has been shown to protect against oxidative stress, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology leading to late graft failure after renal transplantation. We prospectively investigated whether high urinary taurine excretion, reflecting high taurine intake, is associated with low risk for development of late graft failure in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Urinary taurine excretion was measured in a longitudinal cohort of 678 stable RTR. Prospective associations were assessed using Cox regression analyses. Graft failure was defined as the start of dialysis or re-transplantation. In RTR (58% male, 53 ± 13 years old, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 45 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m2), urinary taurine excretion (533 (210-946) µmol/24 h) was significantly associated with serum free sulfhydryl groups (β = 0.126; P = 0.001). During median follow-up for 5.3 (4.5-6.0) years, 83 (12%) patients developed graft failure. In Cox regression analyses, urinary taurine excretion was inversely associated with graft failure (hazard ratio: 0.74 (0.67-0.82); P < 0.001). This association remained significant independent of potential confounders. High urinary taurine excretion is associated with low risk of late graft failure in RTR. Therefore, increasing taurine intake may potentially support graft survival in RTR. Further studies are warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and the potential of taurine supplementation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2212
JournalNutrients
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

kidney transplant
Taurine
taurine
Renal Insufficiency
excretion
Transplants
Kidney
Regression Analysis
Transplant Recipients
sulfhydryl groups
glomerular filtration rate
Graft Survival
dialysis
pathophysiology
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Sulfur
Kidney Transplantation
Dialysis
sulfur
Oxidative Stress

Keywords

  • graft survival
  • renal transplant recipients
  • taurine
  • taurine excretion

Cite this

Post, A., Said, Y., Gomes-Neto, A. W., van der Krogt, J., de Blaauw, P., Berger, S. P., ... Bakker, S. J. L. (2019). Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients. Nutrients, 11(9), [2212]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092212
Post, Adrian ; Said, Yusof ; Gomes-Neto, Antonio W. ; van der Krogt, Jennifer ; de Blaauw, Pim ; Berger, Stefan P. ; Geleijnse, Johanna M. ; Borgonjen, Karin ; van den Berg, Else ; van Goor, Harry ; Rimbach, Gerald ; Kema, Ido P. ; Tsikas, Dimitrios ; Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca ; Bakker, Stephan J.L. / Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients. In: Nutrients. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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abstract = "Taurine is a sulfur containing nutrient that has been shown to protect against oxidative stress, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology leading to late graft failure after renal transplantation. We prospectively investigated whether high urinary taurine excretion, reflecting high taurine intake, is associated with low risk for development of late graft failure in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Urinary taurine excretion was measured in a longitudinal cohort of 678 stable RTR. Prospective associations were assessed using Cox regression analyses. Graft failure was defined as the start of dialysis or re-transplantation. In RTR (58{\%} male, 53 ± 13 years old, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 45 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m2), urinary taurine excretion (533 (210-946) µmol/24 h) was significantly associated with serum free sulfhydryl groups (β = 0.126; P = 0.001). During median follow-up for 5.3 (4.5-6.0) years, 83 (12{\%}) patients developed graft failure. In Cox regression analyses, urinary taurine excretion was inversely associated with graft failure (hazard ratio: 0.74 (0.67-0.82); P < 0.001). This association remained significant independent of potential confounders. High urinary taurine excretion is associated with low risk of late graft failure in RTR. Therefore, increasing taurine intake may potentially support graft survival in RTR. Further studies are warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and the potential of taurine supplementation.",
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author = "Adrian Post and Yusof Said and Gomes-Neto, {Antonio W.} and {van der Krogt}, Jennifer and {de Blaauw}, Pim and Berger, {Stefan P.} and Geleijnse, {Johanna M.} and Karin Borgonjen and {van den Berg}, Else and {van Goor}, Harry and Gerald Rimbach and Kema, {Ido P.} and Dimitrios Tsikas and Rebecca Heiner-Fokkema and Bakker, {Stephan J.L.}",
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Post, A, Said, Y, Gomes-Neto, AW, van der Krogt, J, de Blaauw, P, Berger, SP, Geleijnse, JM, Borgonjen, K, van den Berg, E, van Goor, H, Rimbach, G, Kema, IP, Tsikas, D, Heiner-Fokkema, R & Bakker, SJL 2019, 'Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients', Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 9, 2212. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092212

Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients. / Post, Adrian; Said, Yusof; Gomes-Neto, Antonio W.; van der Krogt, Jennifer; de Blaauw, Pim; Berger, Stefan P.; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Borgonjen, Karin; van den Berg, Else; van Goor, Harry; Rimbach, Gerald; Kema, Ido P.; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca; Bakker, Stephan J.L.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 9, 2212, 13.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients

AU - Post, Adrian

AU - Said, Yusof

AU - Gomes-Neto, Antonio W.

AU - van der Krogt, Jennifer

AU - de Blaauw, Pim

AU - Berger, Stefan P.

AU - Geleijnse, Johanna M.

AU - Borgonjen, Karin

AU - van den Berg, Else

AU - van Goor, Harry

AU - Rimbach, Gerald

AU - Kema, Ido P.

AU - Tsikas, Dimitrios

AU - Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca

AU - Bakker, Stephan J.L.

PY - 2019/9/13

Y1 - 2019/9/13

N2 - Taurine is a sulfur containing nutrient that has been shown to protect against oxidative stress, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology leading to late graft failure after renal transplantation. We prospectively investigated whether high urinary taurine excretion, reflecting high taurine intake, is associated with low risk for development of late graft failure in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Urinary taurine excretion was measured in a longitudinal cohort of 678 stable RTR. Prospective associations were assessed using Cox regression analyses. Graft failure was defined as the start of dialysis or re-transplantation. In RTR (58% male, 53 ± 13 years old, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 45 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m2), urinary taurine excretion (533 (210-946) µmol/24 h) was significantly associated with serum free sulfhydryl groups (β = 0.126; P = 0.001). During median follow-up for 5.3 (4.5-6.0) years, 83 (12%) patients developed graft failure. In Cox regression analyses, urinary taurine excretion was inversely associated with graft failure (hazard ratio: 0.74 (0.67-0.82); P < 0.001). This association remained significant independent of potential confounders. High urinary taurine excretion is associated with low risk of late graft failure in RTR. Therefore, increasing taurine intake may potentially support graft survival in RTR. Further studies are warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and the potential of taurine supplementation.

AB - Taurine is a sulfur containing nutrient that has been shown to protect against oxidative stress, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology leading to late graft failure after renal transplantation. We prospectively investigated whether high urinary taurine excretion, reflecting high taurine intake, is associated with low risk for development of late graft failure in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Urinary taurine excretion was measured in a longitudinal cohort of 678 stable RTR. Prospective associations were assessed using Cox regression analyses. Graft failure was defined as the start of dialysis or re-transplantation. In RTR (58% male, 53 ± 13 years old, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 45 ± 19 mL/min/1.73 m2), urinary taurine excretion (533 (210-946) µmol/24 h) was significantly associated with serum free sulfhydryl groups (β = 0.126; P = 0.001). During median follow-up for 5.3 (4.5-6.0) years, 83 (12%) patients developed graft failure. In Cox regression analyses, urinary taurine excretion was inversely associated with graft failure (hazard ratio: 0.74 (0.67-0.82); P < 0.001). This association remained significant independent of potential confounders. High urinary taurine excretion is associated with low risk of late graft failure in RTR. Therefore, increasing taurine intake may potentially support graft survival in RTR. Further studies are warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and the potential of taurine supplementation.

KW - graft survival

KW - renal transplant recipients

KW - taurine

KW - taurine excretion

U2 - 10.3390/nu11092212

DO - 10.3390/nu11092212

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 9

M1 - 2212

ER -

Post A, Said Y, Gomes-Neto AW, van der Krogt J, de Blaauw P, Berger SP et al. Urinary Taurine Excretion and Risk of Late Graft Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients. Nutrients. 2019 Sep 13;11(9). 2212. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092212