Urinary excretion of advanced glycation end products in dogs and cats

Pornsucha Palaseweenun*, Esther A. Hagen-Plantinga, Thomas J. Schonewille, Gerrit Koop, Claire Butre, Melliana Jonathan, Peter A. Wierenga, Wouter H. Hendriks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was conducted with privately owned dogs and cats to investigate whether a relationship exists between the dietary AGEs and the urinary excretion of AGEs, as indication of possible effective absorption of those compounds in the intestinal tract of pet carnivores. For this purpose, data were collected from both raw fed and dry processed food (DPF) fed to dogs and cats, through spot urine sampling and questionnaires. Raw pet food (RF, low in AGE diets) was fed as a primary food source to 29 dogs and DPF to 28 dogs. Cats were categorized into 3 groups, which were RF (n = 15), DPF (n = 14) and dry and wet processed pet food (DWF, n = 25). Urinary-free carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL) and lysinoalanine (LAL) were analysed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)—mass spectrometry, and were standardized for variable urine concentration by expressing the AGE concentrations as a ratio to urine creatinine (Ucr) concentration (µg/µmol Ucr). Urinary excretion of CML, CEL and LAL in dogs fed with DPF was 2.03, 2.14 and 3 times higher compared to dogs fed with RF (p <.005). Similar to the dogs, a significant difference in CML:Ucr, CEL:Ucr and LAL:Ucr between the three diet groups was observed in cats (p-overall < 0.005, ANOVA), in which the RF fed group excreted less AGEs than the other groups. Linear regression coefficients and SE of CML:Ucr, CEL:Ucr and LAL:Ucr showed that body weight and neuter status were significantly correlated with CML and CEL excretion, but not to LAL excretion. Our results revealed a significant correlation between dietary AGEs and urinary excretion of free CML, CEL and LAL, and also showed that endogenous formation of these AGEs occurs in both dogs and cats under physiological conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-156
JournalJournal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition
Volume105
Issue number1
Early online date11 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • advanced glycation end products
  • cats
  • diet
  • dogs
  • urinary excretion

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