Urban environmental services and the state in East Africa; between neo-developmental and network governance approaches

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20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although governments are generally expected to provide environmental services such as sanitation and solid waste collection for their citizens, most (municipal) governments in Sub-Saharan Africa seem hardly able to take up this task. Without ignoring the lack of material resources resulting from poverty, there are other structural causes for this failure as well and related to the role of the state. Since independence, the state in Africa has been debated in political as well as in academic circles and opposing views can still be discerned today. While some promote a strong interventionist state which can effectively enhance development, others consider introducing network governance by involving various societal actors in combination with different levels of government a more promising alternative. After presenting an historical overview, in this paper I will summarize this debate and discuss future options for East African authorities for providing more effective and sustainable urban environmental infrastructures and services
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1061-1068
JournalGeoforum
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • sub-saharan africa
  • private-sector
  • water
  • uganda
  • sanitation
  • politics
  • tanzania
  • kampala
  • consolidation
  • perspective

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