Upsetting the apple cart? Export fruit production, water pollution and social unrest in the Elgin Valley, South Africa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the encounter between two contrasting visions of how the hydrosocial territory of the Elgin Valley of South Africa is, and should be, constituted and the conflicts over water pollution this gives rise to. It studies how poor urban dwellers try to upset the status quo of unequal access to land and water, which is linked to broader, historically entrenched, inequalities. White commercial farmers have succeeded in upholding the dominant hydro-territorial order by emphasizing the economic importance of their sector, by reducing complex political issues to technical challenges, and by capturing ‘democratic’ water institutions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-205
Number of pages18
JournalWater International
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

fruit production
water pollution
valley
water
economics
Africa
land
conflict

Keywords

  • fruit exports
  • Hydrosocial territories
  • rural-urban struggles
  • South Africa
  • water pollution

Cite this

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title = "Upsetting the apple cart? Export fruit production, water pollution and social unrest in the Elgin Valley, South Africa",
abstract = "This article explores the encounter between two contrasting visions of how the hydrosocial territory of the Elgin Valley of South Africa is, and should be, constituted and the conflicts over water pollution this gives rise to. It studies how poor urban dwellers try to upset the status quo of unequal access to land and water, which is linked to broader, historically entrenched, inequalities. White commercial farmers have succeeded in upholding the dominant hydro-territorial order by emphasizing the economic importance of their sector, by reducing complex political issues to technical challenges, and by capturing ‘democratic’ water institutions.",
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author = "Matthijs Wessels and Veldwisch, {Gert Jan} and Katarzyna Kujawa and Brian Delcarme",
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Upsetting the apple cart? Export fruit production, water pollution and social unrest in the Elgin Valley, South Africa. / Wessels, Matthijs; Veldwisch, Gert Jan; Kujawa, Katarzyna; Delcarme, Brian.

In: Water International, Vol. 44, No. 2, 17.02.2019, p. 188-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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