Unusual features of the Botrytis cinerea mating system

J.A.L. van Kan, P.S. Dyer, L.M. Kohn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingAbstract

Abstract

Botrytis cinerea is a heterothallic ascomycete with two mating types, MAT1-1 and MAT1-2. Fragments of the MAT1- 2-1 and MAT1-1-1 genes were detected bordering idiomorphs of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates, respectively. Both these fragments encode truncated, non-functional proteins. B. cinerea has probably evolved from a homothallic ancestor containing all genes, with MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 arising from the loss of HMG and alpha-domain sequences, leaving the disabled gene fragments present in current loci. Two ORFs, designated MAT1-1-5 and MAT1-2-3, have not previously been reported from other fungi. In a cross of a MAT1-1-5 knockout mutant with a wild type MAT1-2 strain, the stipe develops normally but transition to the differentiation of a cup is blocked. Most B. cinerea isolates act in a standard heterothallic fashion, but some isolates can mate with both MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates and are referred to as ‘dual maters’. Some dual mater isolates can self-fertilize and are truly homothallic. The MAT locus of five dual mater isolates was analysed. Four of those contain a MAT1-2 locus, without any part of the MAT1-1 locus being detected, whereas one homothallic isolate contains a MAT1-1 locus, without any part of the MAT1-2 locus being detected. We conclude that dual mating and homothallism are controlled by factors other than the MAT locus
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBook of Abstracts 26th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, USA, 15-20 March 2011
Pages212
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event26th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, USA -
Duration: 15 Mar 201120 Mar 2011

Conference

Conference26th Fungal Genetics Conference, Asilomar, Pacific Grove, California, USA
Period15/03/1120/03/11

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