Understanding vegetation response to climate variability from space with hyper-spectral, multi-angular observations

M. Menenti, M. Rast, H. Bach, F. Baret, B. van den Hurk, L. Jia, Z.L. Li, W. Knorr, M. Probeck, W. Mauser, J. Miller, J. Moreno, M.E. Schaepman, W. Verhoef, M. Verstraete

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

Abstract

Many vegetation properties are related to features of reflectance spectra in the region 400 nm - 2500 nm. and to emittance in region 8 mm - 14 mm Detailed observations of spectral reflectance reveal subtle features related to biochemical components of leaves such as chlorophyll and water. Exchange of energy between the biosphere and the atmosphere is an important mechanism determining the response of vegetation to climate variability. This requires measurements of the component temperature of foliage and soil. The latter are closely related to the angular variation in thermal infrared emittance. The architecture of vegetation canopies determines complex changes of observed reflectance and emittance spectra with view and illumination angle. Quantitative analysis of reflectance and emittance spectra requires, therefore, an accurate characterization of the anisotropy of radiance. This can be achieved with nearly - simultaneous observations at different view angles. The Surface Processes and Ecosystem Changes Through Response Analysis (SPECTRA) Mission has been conceived to perform these observations at high spatial resolution by taking advantage of the spacecraft agility. Scientific preparations are pursued along two avenues: a) the nature of the expected data and candidate algorithms are evaluated by generating and using synthetic hyper - spectral multi - angular/radiometric data; b) algorithms are evaluated with actual hyper - spectral data collected with a variety of airborne systems and concurrent ground measurements; Campaigns have been performed using radiometric observations provided by ATSR, AATSR, AirMISR, CHRIS - PROBA and a variety of airborne hyperspectral systems. The paper will cover highlights of these studies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing (ISPMSRS), Beijing, 17-19 October 2005
EditorsS. Liang, J. Liu, X. Li, R. Liu, M.E. Schaepman
Place of PublicationBeijing
PublisherISPRS WG VII/1
Pages72-75
VolumeXXXVI
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Event9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing (ISPMSRS) -
Duration: 17 Oct 200519 Oct 2005

Conference

Conference9th International Symposium on Physical Measurements and Signatures in Remote Sensing (ISPMSRS)
Period17/10/0519/10/05

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