Uncertainty quantification of interpolated maps derived from observations with different accuracy levels

Gerard B.M. Heuvelink*, Dick Brus, Tom Hengl, Bas Kempen, Johan G.B. Leenaars, Maria Ruiperez-Gonzalez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most practical applications of spatial interpolation ignore that some measurements may be more accurate than others. As a result all measurements are treated equally important, while it is intuitively clear that more accurate measurements should carry more weight than less accurate measurements. Geostatistics provides the tools to perform spatial interpolation using measurements with different accuracy levels. In this short paper we use these tools to explore the sensitivity of interpolated maps to differences in measurement accuracy for a case study on mapping topsoil clay content in Namibia using kriging with external drift (KED). We also compare the kriging variance maps and show how incorporation of different measurement accuracy levels influences estimation of the KED model parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Spatial Accuracy 2016
EditorsJean-Stéphanie Bailly, Daniel Griffith, Didier Josselin
PublisherInternational Spatial Accuracy Research Association (ISARA)
Pages49-51
ISBN (Print)9782910545105
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event12th International Symposium on Spatial Accuracy Assessment in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Accuracy 2016 - Montpellier, France
Duration: 5 Jul 20168 Jul 2016

Conference

Conference12th International Symposium on Spatial Accuracy Assessment in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Accuracy 2016
CountryFrance
CityMontpellier
Period5/07/168/07/16

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Geostatistics
  • Interpolation
  • Kriging
  • Measurement error
  • Regression
  • Soil

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