Transition of an abandoned Dutch agrosilvopastoral landscape to "new wilderness" by extensive grazing with free-ranging cattle and horses

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

Abstract

The Veluwezoom National Park, a former agrosilvopastoral landscape covering 4900 ha (central part of The Netherlands), was designated in 1930 as a national park after most agricultural activities had been stopped due to changed agroeconomic conditions. The area comprised a mosaic of dry grass-heaths, pastures, abandoned arable fields, scrub and coniferous and deciduous woodland. From the 1980s, transition to 'new wilderness' became the main management aim, applying large-scale extensive grazing. Free-ranging cattle and horses were introduced. It was questioned if the high habitat diversity of this semi-open landscape was maintained by extensive grazing, without additional management measures. Research has been carried out on habitat use and interaction of domestic and wild herbivore grazers, and the impact of grazing on woody regeneration dynamics. Possibilities and constraints of extensive, year-round grazing with free-ranging cattle and horses as a management option in the transition of an agrosilvopastoral landscape to 'new wilderness' are discussed
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSilvopastoralism and sustainable land management
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of an international congress on silvopastoralism and sustainable management held in Lugo, Spain, April 2004
EditorsM.R. Mosquera-Losada, J. McAdam, A. Rigueiro-Rodríguez
Place of PublicationWallingford (UK)
PublisherCABI
Chapter42
Pages148-149
ISBN (Print)9781845930011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
EventInternational congress; Lugo (Spain), april 2004 -
Duration: 15 Jun 200416 Jun 2004

Conference

ConferenceInternational congress; Lugo (Spain), april 2004
Period15/06/0416/06/04

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