Tomaten belichten met minder elektriciteit

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

Abstract

Over the last 10 years, the use of electricity for assimilation lighting has increased considerably. It is now an important part of the energy use of the horticultural sector. To reverse this trend, in the lighting season 2013/2014, we conducted a trial with the aim to reduce the electricity use in a lighted tomato crop by 35% while maintaining production levels. Two treatments were applied: (1) Reference cultivation: clear glass and lighting by 50% HPS lamps and 50% LED intermittent lighting (210 µmol/m2/s), (2) energy efficient cultivation: diffuse greenhouse cover and lighting by 50% LED top lighting and 50% intermittent LED lighting (210 µmol/m2/s). In the energy efficient cultivation, 37% less electricity was used in the period October - May. However, energy use for heating in this treatment was higher to compensate for the lack of radiative heat. The light sum the plants received (sunlight + artificial lighting) was 6% lower in the energy efficient cultivation compared to the reference cultivation due to the lower number of lighting hours. However, the production difference was only 0.3 kg/m2, less than 1%! Detailed plant measurements showed hardly any differences between the treatments in light interception, light absorption by the leaves, photosynthesis and the production and distribution of assimilates. The analysis of the crop growth model showed that the effect of the lower number of lighting hours in the energy efficient cultivation was fully compensated by the positive effects of the diffuse greenhouse cover which has a higher light transmission.
Original languageDutch
Place of PublicationBleiswijk
PublisherWageningen UR Glastuinbouw
Number of pages76
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Publication series

NameRapport GTB
PublisherWageningen UR Glastuinbouw
No.1338

Keywords

  • greenhouse horticulture
  • cultural methods
  • tomatoes
  • solanum lycopersicum
  • illumination
  • led lamps
  • energy consumption
  • efficiency
  • electricity
  • reduction
  • crop production

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