To report or not to report: a psychosocial investigation aimed at improving early detection of avian influenza outbreaks

A.R.W. Elbers, M.J. Gorgievski, K. Zarafshani, G. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify limitations - and solutions for those limitations – with respect to reporting clinically suspect situations on poultry farms, possibly caused by Avian Influenza (AI) with the ultimate aim to facilitate early detection of AI-outbreaks. Focus group sessions were held with policy makers from the veterinary authorities, and representatives of veterinary practitioners and poultry producers. Personal interviews with a small group of poultry farmers and practitioners were held to check proposed limitations and solutions. An electronic questionnaire was mailed to poultry farmers and veterinary practitioners to investigate perceptions and attitudes concerning clinically suspect situations possibly caused by AI. After triangulating the responses of veterinary authorities, veterinary practitioners and poultry farmers, six themes emerged across all groups: 1) lack of knowledge and uncertainty about clinical signs of AI; 2) guilt, shame and prejudice; 3) negative opinion on control measures; 4) dissatisfaction with post-reporting procedures; 5) lack of trust in government bodies; 6) uncertainty and lack of transparency of reporting procedures. In this paper, solutions to break down barriers for reporting a clinically suspect situation are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-449
JournalRevue scientifique et technique / Office International des Epizooties
Volume29
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • h7n7 epidemic
  • descriptive epidemiology
  • clinical signs
  • 2001 foot
  • netherlands
  • disease
  • virus
  • surveillance
  • performance
  • farmers

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