Three-step pathway engineering results in more incidence rate and higher emission of nerolidol and improved attraction of Diadegma semiclausum

B. Houshyani Hassanzadeh, M. Assareh, A. Busquets, A. Ferrer, H.J. Bouwmeester, I.F. Kappers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concentration and ratio of terpenoids in the headspace volatile blend of plants have a fundamental role in the communication of plants and insects. The sesquiterpene (E)-nerolidol is one of the important volatiles with effect on beneficial carnivores for biologic pest management in the field. To optimize de novo biosynthesis and reliable and uniform emission of (E)-nerolidol, we engineered different steps of the (E)-nerolidol biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. Introduction of a mitochondrial nerolidol synthase gene mediates de novo emission of (E)-nerolidol and linalool. Co-expression of the mitochondrial FPS1 and cytosolic HMGR1 increased the number of emitting transgenic plants (incidence rate) and the emission rate of both volatiles. No association between the emission rate of transgenic volatiles and their growth inhibitory effect could be established. (E)-Nerolidol was to a large extent metabolized to non-volatile conjugates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-97
JournalMetabolic Engineering
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • farnesyl-diphosphate synthase
  • arabidopsis-thaliana
  • terpenoid metabolism
  • nicotiana-attenuata
  • mass-spectrometry
  • lesion formation
  • plant volatiles
  • defense
  • biosynthesis
  • herbivores

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