Thermal stability of phytochemicals, HMF and antioxidant activity in cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.)

Mary Luz Olivares-Tenorio*, Ruud Verkerk, Tiny van Boekel, Matthijs Dekker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cape gooseberry is a fruit recognised for having relevant contents of health-promoting compounds. Changes in the content of phytochemicals (ascorbic acid, β-carotene, catechin and epicatechin), hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and antioxidant activity of this fruit were studied at various temperatures and times. Ascorbic acid degradation was described by a first order reaction. β-carotene was not degraded and followed an isomerization reaction from 80 °C onwards. Formation of HMF was described with a consecutive zero together with a first order reaction model. The contents of catechin and epicatechin increased at 40 °C. More than three competing reactions did not allow to make kinetic modelling. Antioxidant activity followed fractional first order conversion model. Comparison with kinetics found in other fruits showed that health-promoting compounds of cape gooseberry are relatively more stable to heat treatment. This makes cape gooseberry suitable for the preparation of foods (jam, juices and dehydrated fruit) with relevant health-promoting compounds contents.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-57
JournalJournal of Functional Foods
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • DPPH assay
  • Flavonoids
  • Health-promoting compounds
  • Heat treatment
  • Modelling
  • β-carotene

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