Theory in social simulation: Status-Power theory, national culture and emergence of the glass ceiling

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is a conceptual exploration of the work of some
eminent social scientists thought to be amenable to agent-based
modelling of social reality. Kemper’s status-power theory and
Hofstede’s dimensions of national culture are the central
theories. The article reviews empirical work on the case of
playing children, with a focus on field studies on pre-puberty
children in several countries. The idea is to investigate
emergence of glass ceiling phenomena1for girls among these
children. A prototype playground simulation gives a proof of
concept.2The conclusion is that applying social scientific theory
to the modelling of social reality seems a promising research
avenue.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Coordination: Principles, Artefacts and Theories (SOCIAL.PATH)
Subtitle of host publicationAISB Convention 2013, University of Exeter, 3rd–5th April, 2013
EditorsHarko Verhagen, Pablo Noriega, Tina Balke, Marina de Vos
Place of PublicationExeter
PublisherUniversity of Exeter
Pages22-29
ISBN (Print)9781908187369
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventSOCIAL.PATH 2013 -
Duration: 4 Apr 20137 Apr 2013

Conference

ConferenceSOCIAL.PATH 2013
Period4/04/137/04/13

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    Hofstede, G. J. (2013). Theory in social simulation: Status-Power theory, national culture and emergence of the glass ceiling. In H. Verhagen, P. Noriega, T. Balke, & M. de Vos (Eds.), Social Coordination: Principles, Artefacts and Theories (SOCIAL.PATH): AISB Convention 2013, University of Exeter, 3rd–5th April, 2013 (pp. 22-29). University of Exeter. https://www.iiia.csic.es/sites/default/files/4927.pdf#page=26