The value of the flood control service of tropical forests: A case study for Trinidad

B.J. Brookhuis*, L.G. Hein

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To date there have been only few case studies that specify howhydrological processes regulated by forests convey into benefits for society. The objective of this paper is to analyse the relation between forest cover and the reduction of flood risks on Trinidad. Our hypothesis is that the relation between forest cover and flood control is non-linear, in otherwords that deforestation of a watershedwill increase flood risks in a non-linearway. This implies that the per hectare value of the hydrological service is determined in part by the remaining forest cover of the catchment. We find that this varies strongly between watersheds, between 16 and 268 US $ per hectare per year. Our results demonstrate a non-linear relationship between catchment's forest cover and the generation of the flood control service, and indicate that even small levels of deforestation can lead to a significant increase in flood risks in Trinidad.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-124
JournalForest Policy and Economics
Volume62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Deforestation
  • Flood risk
  • Forest cover
  • Hydrological service
  • Trinidad
  • Valuation

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