The role of n-3 PUFA-derived fatty acid derivatives and their oxygenated metabolites in the modulation of inflammation

Ian de Bus, Renger Witkamp, Han Zuilhof, Bauke Albada*, Michiel Balvers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Notwithstanding the ongoing debate on their full potential in health and disease, there is general consensus that n-3 PUFAs play important physiological roles. Increasing dietary n-3 PUFA intake results in increased DHA and EPA content in cell membranes as well as an increase in n-3 derived oxylipin and -endocannabinoid concentrations, like fatty acid amides and glycerol-esters. These shifts are believed to (partly) explain the pharmacological and anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 PUFAs. Recent studies discovered that n-3 PUFA-derived endocannabinoids can be further metabolized by the oxidative enzymes CYP-450, LOX and COX, similar to the n-6 derived endocannabinoids. Interestingly, these oxidized n-3 PUFA derived endocannabinoids of eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamide (EPEA) and docosahexaenoyl ethanolamide (DHEA) have higher anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative potential than their precursors. In this review, an overview of recently discovered n-3 PUFA derived endocannabinoids and their metabolites is provided. In addition, the use of chemical probes will be presented as a promising technique to study the n-3 PUFA and n-3 PUFA metabolism within the field of lipid biochemistry.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106351
JournalProstaglandins and Other Lipid Mediators
Volume144
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Chemical probes
  • Endocannabinoid
  • Inflammation
  • Oxygenation
  • PUFA

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