The role of ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio, and stimulus pulse rate on behavioural disturbance of seabass in a net pen

J. Hubert, Y.Y. Neo, H.V. Winter, H. Slabbekoorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Anthropogenic sources increasingly contribute to the underwater soundscape and this may negatively impact aquatic life, including fish. Anthropogenic sound may mask relevant sound, alter behaviour, physiology, and may lead to physical injury. Behavioural effect studies are often seen as critical to evaluate individual and population-level impact. However, behavioural responsiveness likely depends on context and characteristics of sound stimuli. We pose that ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and pulse rate interval (PRI), could affect the behavioural response of fish. To study this, we experimentally exposed groups of tagged European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to different impulsive sound treatments that varied in pulse level, elevated background level, SNR, and PRI. Upon sound exposure, the seabass increased their swimming depth. The variation in the increase in swimming depth could not be attributed to pulse level, background level, SNR or PRI. It may be that the current range of sound levels or PRIs was too narrow to find such effects.
Original languageEnglish
Article number103992
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume170
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

Fingerprint

net pens
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
heart rate
Heart Rate
Fishes
Dicentrarchus labrax
Bass
Masks
aquatic organisms
fish
Wounds and Injuries
physiology

Keywords

  • Anthropogenic noise
  • signal-to-noise ratio
  • Dicentrarchus labrax
  • fish behaviour

Cite this

@article{564b45dc9bc7491ba22761d1eae444a1,
title = "The role of ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio, and stimulus pulse rate on behavioural disturbance of seabass in a net pen",
abstract = "Anthropogenic sources increasingly contribute to the underwater soundscape and this may negatively impact aquatic life, including fish. Anthropogenic sound may mask relevant sound, alter behaviour, physiology, and may lead to physical injury. Behavioural effect studies are often seen as critical to evaluate individual and population-level impact. However, behavioural responsiveness likely depends on context and characteristics of sound stimuli. We pose that ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and pulse rate interval (PRI), could affect the behavioural response of fish. To study this, we experimentally exposed groups of tagged European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to different impulsive sound treatments that varied in pulse level, elevated background level, SNR, and PRI. Upon sound exposure, the seabass increased their swimming depth. The variation in the increase in swimming depth could not be attributed to pulse level, background level, SNR or PRI. It may be that the current range of sound levels or PRIs was too narrow to find such effects.",
keywords = "Anthropogenic noise, signal-to-noise ratio, Dicentrarchus labrax, fish behaviour",
author = "J. Hubert and Y.Y. Neo and H.V. Winter and H. Slabbekoorn",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103992",
language = "English",
volume = "170",
journal = "Behavioural Processes",
issn = "0376-6357",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

The role of ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio, and stimulus pulse rate on behavioural disturbance of seabass in a net pen. / Hubert, J.; Neo, Y.Y.; Winter, H.V.; Slabbekoorn, H.

In: Behavioural Processes, Vol. 170, 103992, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio, and stimulus pulse rate on behavioural disturbance of seabass in a net pen

AU - Hubert, J.

AU - Neo, Y.Y.

AU - Winter, H.V.

AU - Slabbekoorn, H.

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Anthropogenic sources increasingly contribute to the underwater soundscape and this may negatively impact aquatic life, including fish. Anthropogenic sound may mask relevant sound, alter behaviour, physiology, and may lead to physical injury. Behavioural effect studies are often seen as critical to evaluate individual and population-level impact. However, behavioural responsiveness likely depends on context and characteristics of sound stimuli. We pose that ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and pulse rate interval (PRI), could affect the behavioural response of fish. To study this, we experimentally exposed groups of tagged European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to different impulsive sound treatments that varied in pulse level, elevated background level, SNR, and PRI. Upon sound exposure, the seabass increased their swimming depth. The variation in the increase in swimming depth could not be attributed to pulse level, background level, SNR or PRI. It may be that the current range of sound levels or PRIs was too narrow to find such effects.

AB - Anthropogenic sources increasingly contribute to the underwater soundscape and this may negatively impact aquatic life, including fish. Anthropogenic sound may mask relevant sound, alter behaviour, physiology, and may lead to physical injury. Behavioural effect studies are often seen as critical to evaluate individual and population-level impact. However, behavioural responsiveness likely depends on context and characteristics of sound stimuli. We pose that ambient sound levels, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and pulse rate interval (PRI), could affect the behavioural response of fish. To study this, we experimentally exposed groups of tagged European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) to different impulsive sound treatments that varied in pulse level, elevated background level, SNR, and PRI. Upon sound exposure, the seabass increased their swimming depth. The variation in the increase in swimming depth could not be attributed to pulse level, background level, SNR or PRI. It may be that the current range of sound levels or PRIs was too narrow to find such effects.

KW - Anthropogenic noise

KW - signal-to-noise ratio

KW - Dicentrarchus labrax

KW - fish behaviour

U2 - 10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103992

DO - 10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103992

M3 - Article

VL - 170

JO - Behavioural Processes

JF - Behavioural Processes

SN - 0376-6357

M1 - 103992

ER -