The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design

A.F.M. Olsthoorn, J.M. Klap, J.H. Oude Voshaar

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation of fine root density and proximity to the nearest tree or the dominant tree. A large number of samples (37 in one site and 55 in another) was collected in a small plot (10 x 1 m). Two distances were measured at each sampling point: the distance to the nearest tree and the distance to the tree with a dominant crown above that point. There was large variability in fine root density in the samples. Tests with different regression models showed a distinct rooting pattern for one of the two locations. It is concluded that systematic errors in the assessment of fine root density can arise when sampling points are chosen at a constant distance from trees. For Douglas-fir, this systematic error could have been an overestimation of the fine root density by up to 10%. These systematic errors can be avoided easily, using a stratified random design or a random sampling design. When trees are spaced irregularly, a grid sampling design is also appropriate.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)215-221
    JournalPlant and Soil
    Volume211
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

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    fine root
    Pseudotsuga menziesii
    sandy soil
    sandy soils
    plantation
    soil sampling
    plantations
    stem
    stems
    sampling
    rooting
    tree crown
    fine roots
    summer
    testing

    Cite this

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    title = "The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design",
    abstract = "Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation of fine root density and proximity to the nearest tree or the dominant tree. A large number of samples (37 in one site and 55 in another) was collected in a small plot (10 x 1 m). Two distances were measured at each sampling point: the distance to the nearest tree and the distance to the tree with a dominant crown above that point. There was large variability in fine root density in the samples. Tests with different regression models showed a distinct rooting pattern for one of the two locations. It is concluded that systematic errors in the assessment of fine root density can arise when sampling points are chosen at a constant distance from trees. For Douglas-fir, this systematic error could have been an overestimation of the fine root density by up to 10{\%}. These systematic errors can be avoided easily, using a stratified random design or a random sampling design. When trees are spaced irregularly, a grid sampling design is also appropriate.",
    author = "A.F.M. Olsthoorn and J.M. Klap and {Oude Voshaar}, J.H.",
    year = "1999",
    doi = "10.1023/A:1004624707774",
    language = "English",
    volume = "211",
    pages = "215--221",
    journal = "Plant and Soil",
    issn = "0032-079X",
    publisher = "Springer Verlag",

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    The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design. / Olsthoorn, A.F.M.; Klap, J.M.; Oude Voshaar, J.H.

    In: Plant and Soil, Vol. 211, 1999, p. 215-221.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - The relation between fine root density and proximity of stems in closed Douglas-fir plantations on homogen[e]ous sandy soils: implications for sampling design

    AU - Olsthoorn, A.F.M.

    AU - Klap, J.M.

    AU - Oude Voshaar, J.H.

    PY - 1999

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    N2 - Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation of fine root density and proximity to the nearest tree or the dominant tree. A large number of samples (37 in one site and 55 in another) was collected in a small plot (10 x 1 m). Two distances were measured at each sampling point: the distance to the nearest tree and the distance to the tree with a dominant crown above that point. There was large variability in fine root density in the samples. Tests with different regression models showed a distinct rooting pattern for one of the two locations. It is concluded that systematic errors in the assessment of fine root density can arise when sampling points are chosen at a constant distance from trees. For Douglas-fir, this systematic error could have been an overestimation of the fine root density by up to 10%. These systematic errors can be avoided easily, using a stratified random design or a random sampling design. When trees are spaced irregularly, a grid sampling design is also appropriate.

    AB - Studies have been carried out in two fully stocked, fast growing Douglas-fir plantations of the Dutch ACIFORN project in three consecutive years, to obtain information on fine root densities (Olsthoorn 1991). For the present paper, data collected in early summer 1987 were used to study the relation of fine root density and proximity to the nearest tree or the dominant tree. A large number of samples (37 in one site and 55 in another) was collected in a small plot (10 x 1 m). Two distances were measured at each sampling point: the distance to the nearest tree and the distance to the tree with a dominant crown above that point. There was large variability in fine root density in the samples. Tests with different regression models showed a distinct rooting pattern for one of the two locations. It is concluded that systematic errors in the assessment of fine root density can arise when sampling points are chosen at a constant distance from trees. For Douglas-fir, this systematic error could have been an overestimation of the fine root density by up to 10%. These systematic errors can be avoided easily, using a stratified random design or a random sampling design. When trees are spaced irregularly, a grid sampling design is also appropriate.

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