The potential of organic amendments to enhance soil suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani disease in different soils and crops

J. Postma, M.T. Schilder, L.H. Stevens

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Enhancement of disease suppressive properties of soils will limit disease development, thus, being of great importance for sustainable agricultural farming systems. The current research demonstrated that suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2IIIB in sugar beet could be elevated in different soils. Feather meal was most effective and disease spread was reduced with 36-87% in clay as well as in sandy soils. Chitin was effective in clay, but less in sand. Whereas suppressiveness was hardly elevated in loess soils. The potential to enhance suppressiveness was lost after frost (4 weeks -15°C) as well as after flooding soil during 1 or 4 weeks. R. solani was not only suppressed in sugar beet seedlings, but also in cauliflower with AG 2-1 and lettuce with AG 1-1B. R. solani was not suppressed in lettuce with AG 4 HGI and carrot with AG 2-2IIIB. These results indicate that Rhizoctonia-suppressiveness can be enhanced in different soils and different crops, but specificity of the suppressiveness among Rhizoctonia-crop combinations is expected
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationISHS Acta Horticulturae 1044: VIII International Symposium on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation, 18 July 2014, Turin, Italy
EditorsM.L. Gullino, M. Pugliese, J. Katan
Place of PublicationLeuven
PublisherISHS
Pages127-132
Volume1044
ISBN (Print)9789462610255
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventVIII International Symposium on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation -
Duration: 18 Jul 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceVIII International Symposium on Chemical and Non-Chemical Soil and Substrate Disinfestation
Period18/07/14 → …

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