The phenolic compounds, tocopherols, and phytosterols in the edible oil of guava (Psidium guava) seeds obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction

Carlos Eduardo Narváez-Cuenca*, Mary Lucía Inampues-Charfuelan, Andrés Mauricio Hurtado-Benavides, Fabián Parada-Alfonso, Jean Paul Vincken

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An edible oil was obtained from guava seeds by supercritical CO2 extraction. The oil was characterized by its fatty acid composition, physicochemical properties, and the contents of phenolic, miscellaneous, phytosterol, and tocopherol compounds. The oil, obtained with a yield of 8.6 ± 1.2 g oil/100 g guava seeds, had a high content of linoleic acid (78.5 %, w/w), followed by that of oleic acid (13.8 %, w/w). The guava seed oil had physicochemical properties comparable to those published in previous research, except for the low stability to oxidation. The chromatographic profile of the phenolic and miscellaneous compounds was dominated by vanillin (9.6 ± 0.3 mg/100 g oil) and cinnamaldehyde (9.4 ± 0.2 mg/100 g oil), followed by vanillic acid (3.9 ± 0.4 mg/100 g oil), cinnamic acid (2.4 ± 0.1 mg/100 g oil), and minor amounts of other phenolic aldehydes. Among the phytosterols and tocopherols, β-sitosterol (1048.9 ± 48.4 mg/100 g oil) and γ-tocopherol (82.6 ± 3.7 mg/100 g oil) were the most abundant. The low oxidative stability of the oil compared to that published in previous reports might reflect the high complexity of this matrix. This oil might have applications, directly or after blending with more stable edible oils.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103467
JournalJournal of Food Composition and Analysis
Volume89
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Agroindustrial by-products
  • Agroindustrial waste
  • Cinnamaldehyde
  • Linolenic acid
  • Supercritical fluid extraction
  • Tropical fruit
  • Vanillin

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