The Ossekampen Long Term Grassland Experiment; yield responses to temperature and precipitation surplus

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Abstract

The Ossekampen Long Term Grassland Experiment was established in 1958 and consists of eight fertilizer treatments. Since its establishment the management has remained unchanged, with two cuts per year. We used the Ossekampen experiment dataset to assess the effects of temperature and precipitation surplus on annual yields and botanical composition. Yield data of the complete sward were available for all 63 years, while data of the functional groups were available for 40 years. Using a linear mixed model, we found that the dry matter (DM) yield increased with increasing temperature and increasing precipitation surplus. We found that grasses and herbs responded differently to temperature and precipitation surplus. Temperature did not affect the grasses, but only affected the herbs. Also, the yields of the herbs were less affected by drought than those of the grasses.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWhy grasslands?
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 30th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation Leeuwarden, the Netherlands 9-13 June 2024
EditorsC.W. Klootwijk, M. Bruinenberg, M. Cougnon, N.J. Hoekstra, R. Ripoll-Bosch, S. Schelfhout, R.L.M. Schils, T. Vanden Nest, N. van Eekeren, W. Voskamp-Harkema, A. van den Pol-van Dasselaar
Place of PublicationLeiden
PublisherBrill
Pages311-313
ISBN (Electronic)9789090384948
Publication statusPublished - 2024
Event30th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (EGF2024): Why grasslands? - Leeuwarden, Netherlands
Duration: 9 Jun 202413 Jun 2024

Publication series

NameGrassland Science in Europe
Volume29

Conference

Conference30th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation (EGF2024)
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityLeeuwarden
Period9/06/2413/06/24

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