The Influence of Starch and Fibre on In Vitro Protein Digestibility of Dry Fractionated Quinoa Seed (Riobamba Variety)

Mauricio Opazo-Navarrete, Danny Tagle Freire, Remko M. Boom, Anja E.M. Janssen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The in vitro gastric digestibility of the quinoa variety Riobamba was investigated, especially the influence of the quinoa matrix. Dry-fractionated quinoa protein concentrate, which is just milled and sieved, was much better digestible than the same concentrate that was reconstituted from wet fractionated quinoa protein isolate, quinoa starch isolate, and quinoa fibre isolate. In the reconstituted concentrate, the presence of quinoa starch and fibre next to quinoa protein reduces its in vitro gastric digestibility significantly. However, the effect of starch is partially counteracted if the fibre is also present. While the effects of starch and fibre separately can be understood from the decrease of the accessibility for pepsin to hydrolyse proteins, due to the hydrated starch and fibre, we suspect that the synergistic effect of starch and fibre may be due to a relative reduction of the hydration of starch due to the presence of the also strongly hydrating fibre. We concluded that the presence of starch and fibre decreases the protein in vitro gastric digestibility. Therefore, the presence of fibre partially countered the decreased of the protein digestibility of starch. Heating of the matrices to 120 °C generally resulted in much lower digestion rates, due to extensive aggregation of the protein.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-59
JournalFood Biophysics
Volume14
Issue number1
Early online date20 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • In vitro gastric digestion
  • Quinoa fibre
  • Quinoa protein
  • Quinoa starch

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