The genome of Chenopodium quinoa

D.E. Jarvis, Yung Shwen Ho, Damien J. Lightfoot, Sandra M. Schmöckel, Bo Li, T.J.A. Borm, Hajime Ohyanagi, Katsuhiko Mineta, Craig T. Mitchell, Noha Saber, Najeh M. Kharbatia, Ryan R. Rupper, Aaron R. Sharp, Nadine Dally, Berin A. Boughton, Yong H. Woo, Ge Gao, E.G.W.M. Schijlen, Xiujie Guo, Afaque A. MominSónia Negräo, Salim Al-Babili, Christoph Gehring, Ute Roessner, Christian Jung, Kevin Murphy, Stefan T. Arold, Takashi Gojobori, C.G. van der Linden, E.N. van Loo, Eric N. Jellen, Peter J. Maughan, Mark Tester*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

235 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-312
JournalNature
Volume542
Issue number7641
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2017

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