The effects of wing loading and gender on the escape flights of least sandpipers (Calidris minutilla) and western sandpipers (Calidris mauri)

J.G. Burns, R.C. Ydenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High body mass caused by fat storage during migration is believed to increase a bird's risk of predation by decreasing its ability to escape predators. We demonstrate the negative effect of wing loading (mass/wing area) on escape speed and angle of two migrating species of shorebird. We also show significant differences in escape performance between the species and genders. To help explain these differences, we test two potential proximate causes, wing shape and leg bone length. Wing shape is correlated with differences in escape performance between the species, but we found no correlation of wing shape or leg bone length with gender. Ultimately, greater predation risk due to habitat use or larger body size, for the species and genders respectively, may have resulted in evolution of enhanced escape ability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-136
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Scolopacidae
gender
flight
bone
legs
bones
predation
wader
predation risk
habitat use
body mass
fat
body size
Calidris
effect
predator
bird
predators
birds
lipids

Keywords

  • mass-dependent predation
  • take-off ability
  • body-mass
  • morphological adaptations
  • migration chronology
  • british-columbia
  • sex-ratio
  • fuel load
  • risk
  • birds

Cite this

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title = "The effects of wing loading and gender on the escape flights of least sandpipers (Calidris minutilla) and western sandpipers (Calidris mauri)",
abstract = "High body mass caused by fat storage during migration is believed to increase a bird's risk of predation by decreasing its ability to escape predators. We demonstrate the negative effect of wing loading (mass/wing area) on escape speed and angle of two migrating species of shorebird. We also show significant differences in escape performance between the species and genders. To help explain these differences, we test two potential proximate causes, wing shape and leg bone length. Wing shape is correlated with differences in escape performance between the species, but we found no correlation of wing shape or leg bone length with gender. Ultimately, greater predation risk due to habitat use or larger body size, for the species and genders respectively, may have resulted in evolution of enhanced escape ability.",
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The effects of wing loading and gender on the escape flights of least sandpipers (Calidris minutilla) and western sandpipers (Calidris mauri). / Burns, J.G.; Ydenberg, R.C.

In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, Vol. 52, No. 2, 2002, p. 128-136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of wing loading and gender on the escape flights of least sandpipers (Calidris minutilla) and western sandpipers (Calidris mauri)

AU - Burns, J.G.

AU - Ydenberg, R.C.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - High body mass caused by fat storage during migration is believed to increase a bird's risk of predation by decreasing its ability to escape predators. We demonstrate the negative effect of wing loading (mass/wing area) on escape speed and angle of two migrating species of shorebird. We also show significant differences in escape performance between the species and genders. To help explain these differences, we test two potential proximate causes, wing shape and leg bone length. Wing shape is correlated with differences in escape performance between the species, but we found no correlation of wing shape or leg bone length with gender. Ultimately, greater predation risk due to habitat use or larger body size, for the species and genders respectively, may have resulted in evolution of enhanced escape ability.

AB - High body mass caused by fat storage during migration is believed to increase a bird's risk of predation by decreasing its ability to escape predators. We demonstrate the negative effect of wing loading (mass/wing area) on escape speed and angle of two migrating species of shorebird. We also show significant differences in escape performance between the species and genders. To help explain these differences, we test two potential proximate causes, wing shape and leg bone length. Wing shape is correlated with differences in escape performance between the species, but we found no correlation of wing shape or leg bone length with gender. Ultimately, greater predation risk due to habitat use or larger body size, for the species and genders respectively, may have resulted in evolution of enhanced escape ability.

KW - mass-dependent predation

KW - take-off ability

KW - body-mass

KW - morphological adaptations

KW - migration chronology

KW - british-columbia

KW - sex-ratio

KW - fuel load

KW - risk

KW - birds

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DO - 10.1007/s00265-002-0494-y

M3 - Article

VL - 52

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JO - Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology

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