The effects of practicing registration of organ donation preference on self-efficacy and registration intention: An enactive mastery experience

Astrid Reubsaet*, Johannes Brug, Emely De Vet, Bart Van Den Borne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To evaluate an intervention to increase self-efficacy intentions to register organ donation preference, a Randomized Controlled Trial was conducted among 242 Dutch high-school students aged 15 to 18 years. On the basis of Social Cognitive Theory, practicing with a standard registration form (according to the Dutch system) was expected to increase the intention to register an organ donation preference through increasing self-efficacy. The participants in the experimental group practiced how to complete a registration form while the control group did not receive an intervention. Students in both groups completed a self-administered questionnaire before and after the intervention took place. The results showed that self-efficacy and intentions to register organ donation preferences at post-test were significantly higher in the intervention group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)585-594
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Intention
  • Organ donation
  • Registration
  • Self-efficacy

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