The effect of West Nile virus perceptions and knowledge on protective behavior and mosquito breeding in residential yards in Upstate New York

W. Tuiten, C.J.M. Koenraadt, K. McComas, L.C. Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire combined with entomological surveys of residential mosquito-breeding sites were conducted in two Upstate New York neighborhoods. We tested the hypothesis that “correct” West Nile virus (WNV) knowledge and perceptions correspond with the use of practices that prevent mosquitoes from breeding and biting. Our results demonstrate that perceptions of WNV relate to the number of positive containers in yards and the use of mosquito preventive measures. In contrast, WNV knowledge was not related. Culex pipiens and Cx. restuans were common species found breeding in containers. Aedes japonicus was the most abundant species in 77% of positive containers (buckets, flower pots, and birdbaths). This new, invasive mosquito together with the Culex species identified in this study represent significant potential as vectors of WNV and other arboviruses affecting human and animal health. We conclude that more training and education programs should focus on WNV control strategies and recognizing mosquito breeding in residential yards. This is the first study to directly investigate the relationship between KAP and breeding of WNV vectors in residential yards.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)42-51
JournalEcoHealth
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • education campaign
  • united-states
  • culicidae
  • outbreak
  • diptera

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