The development of reed composite fiber boards using partially bio-based, formaldehyde- and monomeric isocyanate-free resins

E.R.P. Keijsers, M.J.A. van den Oever, J.E.G. van Dam, Aad Lansbergen, Cor Koning, Harald van der Akker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleProfessional

Abstract

The transition towards a bio-based economy increases the demand for wood biomass. The increasing use of wood as raw material for paper, building materials and energy production results in increasing prices. Other types of biomass, e.g. reed released in nature conservation practice, could provide an alternative for the use of wood in e.g. particle boards. Particle board production plants have a relatively small capacity compared to e.g. pulping facilities for paper production. Combined with the high transportation costs of alternative fiber sources, due to low bulk density, the use of locally available raw material for particle board production is economically essential. In several countries wheat straw-based particle board material is currently produced using MDI-glue. Because of the high price of wheat straw in the Netherlands, other raw materials are of interest. Reed is a possible alternative, as large amounts of reed can be made available through nature conservation practice. Currently the value of this reed is negative and burning in nature is no longer allowed.
Natuurmonumenten together with DSM, intends to convert the biomass released in nature conservation practice (ca. 175.000 t/y reed, grass, straw and woody biomass) into high quality feedstock for the bioeconomy and to contribute in this way to an enhanced sustainability of The Netherlands. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of using reed and a new (partially) bio-based resin in the production of fiber composite boards.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-203
JournalReinforced Plastics
Volume64
Issue number4
Early online date25 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

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