The change capacity of organizations: general assessment and exploring nine configurations

K.M. Bennebroek Gravenhorst, A. Werkman, J.J. Boonstra

    Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paperAcademic

    Abstract

    Effecting major organizational change and innovation is a complex process and many organizations do not obtain the outcomes they desire. The purpose of this paper is investigate which factors contribute to or hinder far-reaching change. These factors are sought in characteristics of organizations, and in the design and management of change processes. Thus, we distinguish fifteen aspects to be evaluated when assessing the change capacity of organizations. In addition, we explore possible underlying patterns in the change capacity of organizations. Our first results suggested that none of the fifteen aspects we distinguished were really problematic. This may lead to the conclusion that in general organizations and change processes run rather satisfying. This is counterintuitive. Thus, we needed to perform additional and more sophisticated analyses. A cluster analysis was performed in order to explore possible underlying configurations in the barriers to change. We found nine configurations which were interpreted as the innovative organization, the professional organization, the organization with aged technology, the longing organization, the political organization, the organization entangled in problematic technological change, the insecure organization, the organization with an awkward approach to change and the skeptical organization. In the discussion we focus on the general implications of these results and on their meaning for practitioners.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 1999
    EventNinth European Congress on Work and Organizational Psychology -
    Duration: 12 May 199915 May 1999

    Conference

    ConferenceNinth European Congress on Work and Organizational Psychology
    Period12/05/9915/05/99

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The change capacity of organizations: general assessment and exploring nine configurations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this