The cap snatching of segmented negative sense rna viruses as a tool to map the transcription start sites of heterologous co-infecting viruses

Wenzhong Lin, Ping Qiu, Jing Jin, Shunmin Liu, Saif Ul Islam, Jinguang Yang, Jie Zhang, Richard Kormelink, Zhenguo Du*, Zujian Wu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identification of the transcription start sites (TSSs) of a virus is of great importance to understand and dissect the mechanism of viral genome transcription but this often requires costly and laborious experiments. Many segmented negative-sense RNA viruses (sNSVs) cleave capped leader sequences from a large variety of mRNAs and use these cleaved leaders as primers for transcription in a conserved process called cap snatching. The recent developments in high-throughput sequencing have made it possible to determine most, if not all, of the capped RNAs snatched by a sNSV. Here, we show that rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV), a plant-infecting sNSV, co-infects Nicotiana benthamiana with two different begomoviruses and snatches capped leader sequences from their mRNAs. By determining the 5' termini of a single RSV mRNA with high-throughput sequencing, the 5' ends of almost all the mRNAs of the co-infecting begomoviruses could be identified and mapped on their genomes. The findings in this study provide support for the using of the cap snatching of sNSVs as a tool to map viral TSSs.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2519
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume8
Issue numberDEC
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Cap-snatching
  • Co-infection
  • Geminivirus
  • Rice stripe virus
  • SNSV
  • Tenuivirus
  • TSS

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