The blurring of boundaries between research and everyday life: dilemmas of employing one's own experiential knowledge in disability research

K. Mogendorff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Researchers with experiential disability knowledge increasingly engage in socio-medical research. In this paper the author discusses her experiences with employing her own lived experiences with disability in academic and non-academic research projects. Incorporating one's own lived experiences in research implies a blurring of boundaries between the private, the professional, and the public. The latter may give rise to dilemmas of double membership and dilemmas of disclosure in publications. Double membership may become problematic for disabled researchers who identify with the disability community if conceptualizations of disability in scientific communities unwittingly echo negative societal images of disability. Because of the low status of disabled people and of experiential knowledge, disclosure of own experiences with disability may negatively influence young disabled researchers' careers.
Original languageEnglish
JournalDisability Studies Quarterly
Volume33
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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experiential knowledge
everyday life
disability
experience
medical research
scientific community
research project
career
community

Cite this

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abstract = "Researchers with experiential disability knowledge increasingly engage in socio-medical research. In this paper the author discusses her experiences with employing her own lived experiences with disability in academic and non-academic research projects. Incorporating one's own lived experiences in research implies a blurring of boundaries between the private, the professional, and the public. The latter may give rise to dilemmas of double membership and dilemmas of disclosure in publications. Double membership may become problematic for disabled researchers who identify with the disability community if conceptualizations of disability in scientific communities unwittingly echo negative societal images of disability. Because of the low status of disabled people and of experiential knowledge, disclosure of own experiences with disability may negatively influence young disabled researchers' careers.",
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The blurring of boundaries between research and everyday life: dilemmas of employing one's own experiential knowledge in disability research. / Mogendorff, K.

In: Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - Researchers with experiential disability knowledge increasingly engage in socio-medical research. In this paper the author discusses her experiences with employing her own lived experiences with disability in academic and non-academic research projects. Incorporating one's own lived experiences in research implies a blurring of boundaries between the private, the professional, and the public. The latter may give rise to dilemmas of double membership and dilemmas of disclosure in publications. Double membership may become problematic for disabled researchers who identify with the disability community if conceptualizations of disability in scientific communities unwittingly echo negative societal images of disability. Because of the low status of disabled people and of experiential knowledge, disclosure of own experiences with disability may negatively influence young disabled researchers' careers.

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JO - Disability Studies Quarterly

JF - Disability Studies Quarterly

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