The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties.

W.D.C. Schenkeveld, A.M. Reichwein, E.J.M. Temminghoff, W.H. van Riemsdijk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

FeEDDHA products are applied to correct iron chlorosis in plants and consist of a mixture of EDDHA isomers chelated to iron. In this study such mixtures have been divided into four (groups of) isomers: racemic o,o-EDDHA, meso o,o-EDDHA, o,p-EDDHA and rest-EDDHA. The physical and chemical properties of these isomers differ and hence does their ability to deliver Fe to plants. To come to a soil-specific iron fertilization recommendation, the behaviour of the EDDHA isomers in the soil needs to be understood. This behaviour has been examined in a soil interaction experiment as a function of time, and it has been related to soil properties. The isomer fractions remaining in solution can be ranked racemic o,o-FeEDDHA > meso o,o-FeEDDHA > rest-FeEDDHA > o,p-FeEDDHA, regardless of soil properties. The o,o-EDDHA isomers largely determine the Fe concentration in solution. Although rest-EDDHA also consists of compounds that chelate Fe more strongly than meso o,o-EDDHA, the latter is on average better capable of keeping Fe in solution upon interaction with soil. The principal adsorption surface differs per EDDHA isomer. For racemic o,o-FeEDDHA it is organic matter, for meso o,o-FeEDDHA it is iron (hydr)oxide and for o,p-FeEDDHA clay minerals. Cu and Al are important competing cations. Cu forms soluble complexes with o,p-EDDHA, and Al with meso o,o-EDDHA not chelated to Fe. Al is likely to affect the effectiveness of a potential shuttle effect. The tendency of o,p-FeEDDHA and rest-FeEDDHA to be removed from solution, makes these isomers less effective as iron fertilizer in soil application, in particular on clay soils.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-102
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume290
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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isomers
soil properties
soil property
soil
iron
iron fertilizers
isomer
chelate
iron oxides
chelates
clay minerals
chlorosis
clay soil
soil treatment
clay soils
iron oxide
clay mineral
chemical property
cations
physical properties

Keywords

  • calcareous soil
  • iron-chlorosis
  • chelating-agents
  • supply iron
  • acid eddha
  • plants
  • bicarbonate
  • fertilizers
  • iron(iii)
  • manganese

Cite this

Schenkeveld, W. D. C., Reichwein, A. M., Temminghoff, E. J. M., & van Riemsdijk, W. H. (2007). The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties. Plant and Soil, 290(1-2), 85-102. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-006-9135-y
Schenkeveld, W.D.C. ; Reichwein, A.M. ; Temminghoff, E.J.M. ; van Riemsdijk, W.H. / The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties. In: Plant and Soil. 2007 ; Vol. 290, No. 1-2. pp. 85-102.
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title = "The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties.",
abstract = "FeEDDHA products are applied to correct iron chlorosis in plants and consist of a mixture of EDDHA isomers chelated to iron. In this study such mixtures have been divided into four (groups of) isomers: racemic o,o-EDDHA, meso o,o-EDDHA, o,p-EDDHA and rest-EDDHA. The physical and chemical properties of these isomers differ and hence does their ability to deliver Fe to plants. To come to a soil-specific iron fertilization recommendation, the behaviour of the EDDHA isomers in the soil needs to be understood. This behaviour has been examined in a soil interaction experiment as a function of time, and it has been related to soil properties. The isomer fractions remaining in solution can be ranked racemic o,o-FeEDDHA > meso o,o-FeEDDHA > rest-FeEDDHA > o,p-FeEDDHA, regardless of soil properties. The o,o-EDDHA isomers largely determine the Fe concentration in solution. Although rest-EDDHA also consists of compounds that chelate Fe more strongly than meso o,o-EDDHA, the latter is on average better capable of keeping Fe in solution upon interaction with soil. The principal adsorption surface differs per EDDHA isomer. For racemic o,o-FeEDDHA it is organic matter, for meso o,o-FeEDDHA it is iron (hydr)oxide and for o,p-FeEDDHA clay minerals. Cu and Al are important competing cations. Cu forms soluble complexes with o,p-EDDHA, and Al with meso o,o-EDDHA not chelated to Fe. Al is likely to affect the effectiveness of a potential shuttle effect. The tendency of o,p-FeEDDHA and rest-FeEDDHA to be removed from solution, makes these isomers less effective as iron fertilizer in soil application, in particular on clay soils.",
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author = "W.D.C. Schenkeveld and A.M. Reichwein and E.J.M. Temminghoff and {van Riemsdijk}, W.H.",
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Schenkeveld, WDC, Reichwein, AM, Temminghoff, EJM & van Riemsdijk, WH 2007, 'The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties.', Plant and Soil, vol. 290, no. 1-2, pp. 85-102. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-006-9135-y

The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties. / Schenkeveld, W.D.C.; Reichwein, A.M.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; van Riemsdijk, W.H.

In: Plant and Soil, Vol. 290, No. 1-2, 2007, p. 85-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties.

AU - Schenkeveld, W.D.C.

AU - Reichwein, A.M.

AU - Temminghoff, E.J.M.

AU - van Riemsdijk, W.H.

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - FeEDDHA products are applied to correct iron chlorosis in plants and consist of a mixture of EDDHA isomers chelated to iron. In this study such mixtures have been divided into four (groups of) isomers: racemic o,o-EDDHA, meso o,o-EDDHA, o,p-EDDHA and rest-EDDHA. The physical and chemical properties of these isomers differ and hence does their ability to deliver Fe to plants. To come to a soil-specific iron fertilization recommendation, the behaviour of the EDDHA isomers in the soil needs to be understood. This behaviour has been examined in a soil interaction experiment as a function of time, and it has been related to soil properties. The isomer fractions remaining in solution can be ranked racemic o,o-FeEDDHA > meso o,o-FeEDDHA > rest-FeEDDHA > o,p-FeEDDHA, regardless of soil properties. The o,o-EDDHA isomers largely determine the Fe concentration in solution. Although rest-EDDHA also consists of compounds that chelate Fe more strongly than meso o,o-EDDHA, the latter is on average better capable of keeping Fe in solution upon interaction with soil. The principal adsorption surface differs per EDDHA isomer. For racemic o,o-FeEDDHA it is organic matter, for meso o,o-FeEDDHA it is iron (hydr)oxide and for o,p-FeEDDHA clay minerals. Cu and Al are important competing cations. Cu forms soluble complexes with o,p-EDDHA, and Al with meso o,o-EDDHA not chelated to Fe. Al is likely to affect the effectiveness of a potential shuttle effect. The tendency of o,p-FeEDDHA and rest-FeEDDHA to be removed from solution, makes these isomers less effective as iron fertilizer in soil application, in particular on clay soils.

AB - FeEDDHA products are applied to correct iron chlorosis in plants and consist of a mixture of EDDHA isomers chelated to iron. In this study such mixtures have been divided into four (groups of) isomers: racemic o,o-EDDHA, meso o,o-EDDHA, o,p-EDDHA and rest-EDDHA. The physical and chemical properties of these isomers differ and hence does their ability to deliver Fe to plants. To come to a soil-specific iron fertilization recommendation, the behaviour of the EDDHA isomers in the soil needs to be understood. This behaviour has been examined in a soil interaction experiment as a function of time, and it has been related to soil properties. The isomer fractions remaining in solution can be ranked racemic o,o-FeEDDHA > meso o,o-FeEDDHA > rest-FeEDDHA > o,p-FeEDDHA, regardless of soil properties. The o,o-EDDHA isomers largely determine the Fe concentration in solution. Although rest-EDDHA also consists of compounds that chelate Fe more strongly than meso o,o-EDDHA, the latter is on average better capable of keeping Fe in solution upon interaction with soil. The principal adsorption surface differs per EDDHA isomer. For racemic o,o-FeEDDHA it is organic matter, for meso o,o-FeEDDHA it is iron (hydr)oxide and for o,p-FeEDDHA clay minerals. Cu and Al are important competing cations. Cu forms soluble complexes with o,p-EDDHA, and Al with meso o,o-EDDHA not chelated to Fe. Al is likely to affect the effectiveness of a potential shuttle effect. The tendency of o,p-FeEDDHA and rest-FeEDDHA to be removed from solution, makes these isomers less effective as iron fertilizer in soil application, in particular on clay soils.

KW - calcareous soil

KW - iron-chlorosis

KW - chelating-agents

KW - supply iron

KW - acid eddha

KW - plants

KW - bicarbonate

KW - fertilizers

KW - iron(iii)

KW - manganese

U2 - 10.1007/s11104-006-9135-y

DO - 10.1007/s11104-006-9135-y

M3 - Article

VL - 290

SP - 85

EP - 102

JO - Plant and Soil

JF - Plant and Soil

SN - 0032-079X

IS - 1-2

ER -

Schenkeveld WDC, Reichwein AM, Temminghoff EJM, van Riemsdijk WH. The behaviour of EDDHA isomers in soils as influenced by soil properties. Plant and Soil. 2007;290(1-2):85-102. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-006-9135-y