The Basophil Activation Test for Clinical Management of Food Allergies: Recent Advances and Future Directions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstract: The basophil activation test (BAT) is an ex vivo functional assay that measures by flow cytometry the degree of basophil degranulation after stimulation with an allergen. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the diagnostic value of the BAT as it has the potential to mimic the clinical phenotype of sIgE sensitized patients, in contrast to allergen-specific IgE levels. This diagnostic potential would be of particular interest for food allergies present early in life such as peanut, cow’s milk and eggs, which require an expensive, time-consuming and patient unfriendly oral food challenge (OFC) for diagnosis. However, routine applications of the BAT for clinical use are not yet feasible due to the lack of standardized protocols and large clinical validation studies. This review will summarize the current data regarding the application of the BAT in food allergy (FA) for cow’s milk, egg and peanut, being the most common causes of FA in children. Additionally, it will discuss the hurdles for widespread clinical use of the BAT and possible future directions for this diagnostic procedure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1335-1348
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Asthma and Allergy
Volume2021
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Basophil activation test
  • Chicken egg
  • Cow’s milk
  • Diagnosis
  • Food allergy
  • Peanut

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Basophil Activation Test for Clinical Management of Food Allergies: Recent Advances and Future Directions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this