The archaeal 'TACK' superphylum and the origin of eukaryotes

Lionel Guy, Thijs J.G. Ettema*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although most hypotheses to explain the emergence of the eukaryotic lineage are conflicting, some consensus exists concerning the requirement of a genomic fusion between archaeal and bacterial components. Recent phylogenomic studies have provided support for eocyte-like scenarios in which the alleged 'archaeal parent' of the eukaryotic cell emerged from the Crenarchaeota/Thaumarchaeota. Here, we provide evidence for a scenario in which this archaeal parent emerged from within the 'TACK' superphylum that comprises the Thaumarchaeota, Crenarchaeota and Korarchaeota, as well as the recently proposed phylum 'Aigarchaeota'. In support of this view, functional and comparative genomics studies have unearthed an increasing number of features that are uniquely shared by the TACK superphylum and eukaryotes, including proteins involved in cytokinesis, membrane remodeling, cell shape determination and protein recycling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-587
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in Microbiology
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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