The ability of the biological control agent Bacillus subtilis, strain BB, to colonise vegetable brassicas endophytically following seed inoculation

E.G. Wulff, J.W.L. van Vuurde, J. Hockenhull

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The ability of Bacillus subtilis, strain BB, to colonise cabbage seedlings endophytically was examined following seed inoculation. Strain BB was recovered from different plant parts including leaves (cotyledons), stem (hypocotyl) and roots. While high bacterial populations persisted in the roots and lower stem, they were lower in the upper stem and leaves through time. In addition to cabbage, strain BB colonised endophytically the roots of 5 other vegetable brassicas. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and PCR fingerprinting analysis confirmed the reliability of the detection method. Studies conducted with transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that BB mainly colonised intercellular spaces of cortical tissues including intercellular spaces close to the conducting elements of roots and stem of cabbage seedlings. Gold labelling was specifically associated with BB and the fibrillar material filling the intercellular spaces where bacterial cells were found.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)463-474
    JournalPlant and Soil
    Volume255
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • bacterial endophytes
    • sweet corn
    • cotton
    • roots
    • localization
    • identity
    • location
    • grasses
    • wheat

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