Testing for disconnection and distance effects on physiological self-recognition within clonal fragments of Potentilla reptans

B. Chen, P.J. Vermeulen, H.J. During, N.P.R. Anten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that belowground self-recognition in clonal plants can be disrupted between sister ramets by the loss of connections or long distances within a genet. However, these results may be confounded by severing connections between ramets in the setups. Using Potentilla reptans, we examined severance effects in a setup that grew ramet pairs with connections either intact or severed. We showed that severance generally reduced new stolon mass but had no effect on root allocation of ramets. However, it did reduce root mass of younger ramets of the pairs. We also explored evidence for physiological self-recognition with another setup that avoided severing connections by manipulating root interactions between closely connected ramets, between remotely connected ramets and between disconnected ramets within one genet. We found that ramets grown with disconnected neighbors had less new stolon mass, similar root mass but higher root allocation as compared to ramets grown with connected neighbors. There was no difference in ramet growth between closely connected- and remotely connected-neighbor treatments. We suggest that severing connections affects ramet interactions by disrupting their physiological integration. Using the second setup, we provide unbiased evidence for physiological self-recognition, while also suggesting that it can persist over long distances.
Original languageEnglish
Article number215
Number of pages9
JournalFrontiers in Plant Science
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • herb glechoma-hederacea
  • fragaria-chiloensis
  • nutrient availability
  • kin recognition
  • rooting volume
  • pot size
  • plant
  • integration
  • ramets
  • discrimination

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