Testing for complementarity in phosphorus resource use by mixtures of crop species

Chunjie Li, T.W.M. Kuijper, Wopke van der Werf, Junling Zhang, Haigang Li*, Fusuo Zhang, Ellis Hoffland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: The phosphorus (P) resource partitioning hypothesis assumes that dissimilarity in P acquisition traits among plant species leads to enhanced P uptake by crop combinations compared with their sole crops. We developed and implemented a test for this hypothesis. Methods: Two pot experiments were conducted with quartz sands. In Experiment 1, the ability of the crop species to acquire P from sparingly soluble sources (Ca phosphate (CaP), phytate (PhyP) and P-coated Fe (hydr)oxide (FeP)) was tested. In accordance with the species performances in Experiment 1, combinations of millet/chickpea and cabbage/faba bean (which have dissimilar P acquisition traits) and wheat/maize (which have similar traits) were selected for Experiment 2. The biomass production and P uptake were compared between the sole crops and species combinations as well as between the single and mixed P sources. Results: A dissimilarity in P acquisition traits enhanced P uptake by millet/chickpea on CaP/PhyP (as expected) but not by cabbage/faba bean on FeP/PhyP. Despite their similar P acquisition traits, we found enhanced P uptake by wheat/maize on CaP/PhyP. Conclusions: Because of complicating factors such as unstable P acquisition traits and competitive inequality between species, the conditions under which the P resource partitioning hypothesis can be tested are limited. This challenge complicates designing for complementarity in soil P pools by intercrops.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-177
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume439
Issue number1-2
Early online date29 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

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mixed cropping
complementarity
resource use
phosphorus
crop
niche partitioning
millet
phosphate
phosphates
millets
crops
faba beans
cabbage
wheat
experiment
maize
testing
corn
quartz
phytic acid

Keywords

  • Competition
  • Complementarity
  • Intercrop
  • Phosphorus
  • Resource partitioning

Cite this

@article{d4ec6074267e497c8c606ac905752038,
title = "Testing for complementarity in phosphorus resource use by mixtures of crop species",
abstract = "Aims: The phosphorus (P) resource partitioning hypothesis assumes that dissimilarity in P acquisition traits among plant species leads to enhanced P uptake by crop combinations compared with their sole crops. We developed and implemented a test for this hypothesis. Methods: Two pot experiments were conducted with quartz sands. In Experiment 1, the ability of the crop species to acquire P from sparingly soluble sources (Ca phosphate (CaP), phytate (PhyP) and P-coated Fe (hydr)oxide (FeP)) was tested. In accordance with the species performances in Experiment 1, combinations of millet/chickpea and cabbage/faba bean (which have dissimilar P acquisition traits) and wheat/maize (which have similar traits) were selected for Experiment 2. The biomass production and P uptake were compared between the sole crops and species combinations as well as between the single and mixed P sources. Results: A dissimilarity in P acquisition traits enhanced P uptake by millet/chickpea on CaP/PhyP (as expected) but not by cabbage/faba bean on FeP/PhyP. Despite their similar P acquisition traits, we found enhanced P uptake by wheat/maize on CaP/PhyP. Conclusions: Because of complicating factors such as unstable P acquisition traits and competitive inequality between species, the conditions under which the P resource partitioning hypothesis can be tested are limited. This challenge complicates designing for complementarity in soil P pools by intercrops.",
keywords = "Competition, Complementarity, Intercrop, Phosphorus, Resource partitioning",
author = "Chunjie Li and T.W.M. Kuijper and {van der Werf}, Wopke and Junling Zhang and Haigang Li and Fusuo Zhang and Ellis Hoffland",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s11104-018-3732-4",
language = "English",
volume = "439",
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journal = "Plant and Soil",
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Testing for complementarity in phosphorus resource use by mixtures of crop species. / Li, Chunjie; Kuijper, T.W.M.; van der Werf, Wopke; Zhang, Junling; Li, Haigang; Zhang, Fusuo; Hoffland, Ellis.

In: Plant and Soil, Vol. 439, No. 1-2, 06.2019, p. 163-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testing for complementarity in phosphorus resource use by mixtures of crop species

AU - Li, Chunjie

AU - Kuijper, T.W.M.

AU - van der Werf, Wopke

AU - Zhang, Junling

AU - Li, Haigang

AU - Zhang, Fusuo

AU - Hoffland, Ellis

PY - 2019/6

Y1 - 2019/6

N2 - Aims: The phosphorus (P) resource partitioning hypothesis assumes that dissimilarity in P acquisition traits among plant species leads to enhanced P uptake by crop combinations compared with their sole crops. We developed and implemented a test for this hypothesis. Methods: Two pot experiments were conducted with quartz sands. In Experiment 1, the ability of the crop species to acquire P from sparingly soluble sources (Ca phosphate (CaP), phytate (PhyP) and P-coated Fe (hydr)oxide (FeP)) was tested. In accordance with the species performances in Experiment 1, combinations of millet/chickpea and cabbage/faba bean (which have dissimilar P acquisition traits) and wheat/maize (which have similar traits) were selected for Experiment 2. The biomass production and P uptake were compared between the sole crops and species combinations as well as between the single and mixed P sources. Results: A dissimilarity in P acquisition traits enhanced P uptake by millet/chickpea on CaP/PhyP (as expected) but not by cabbage/faba bean on FeP/PhyP. Despite their similar P acquisition traits, we found enhanced P uptake by wheat/maize on CaP/PhyP. Conclusions: Because of complicating factors such as unstable P acquisition traits and competitive inequality between species, the conditions under which the P resource partitioning hypothesis can be tested are limited. This challenge complicates designing for complementarity in soil P pools by intercrops.

AB - Aims: The phosphorus (P) resource partitioning hypothesis assumes that dissimilarity in P acquisition traits among plant species leads to enhanced P uptake by crop combinations compared with their sole crops. We developed and implemented a test for this hypothesis. Methods: Two pot experiments were conducted with quartz sands. In Experiment 1, the ability of the crop species to acquire P from sparingly soluble sources (Ca phosphate (CaP), phytate (PhyP) and P-coated Fe (hydr)oxide (FeP)) was tested. In accordance with the species performances in Experiment 1, combinations of millet/chickpea and cabbage/faba bean (which have dissimilar P acquisition traits) and wheat/maize (which have similar traits) were selected for Experiment 2. The biomass production and P uptake were compared between the sole crops and species combinations as well as between the single and mixed P sources. Results: A dissimilarity in P acquisition traits enhanced P uptake by millet/chickpea on CaP/PhyP (as expected) but not by cabbage/faba bean on FeP/PhyP. Despite their similar P acquisition traits, we found enhanced P uptake by wheat/maize on CaP/PhyP. Conclusions: Because of complicating factors such as unstable P acquisition traits and competitive inequality between species, the conditions under which the P resource partitioning hypothesis can be tested are limited. This challenge complicates designing for complementarity in soil P pools by intercrops.

KW - Competition

KW - Complementarity

KW - Intercrop

KW - Phosphorus

KW - Resource partitioning

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DO - 10.1007/s11104-018-3732-4

M3 - Article

VL - 439

SP - 163

EP - 177

JO - Plant and Soil

JF - Plant and Soil

SN - 0032-079X

IS - 1-2

ER -