Taste enhancement in food gels: Effect of fracture properties on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity

A.C. Mosca, F. van de Velde, J.H.F. Bult, M.A.J.S. van Boekel, M.A. Stieger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigates the effects of fracture strain and fracture stress on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity of semi-solid food gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers. The sweetness intensity of gels was mainly affected by the total surface area of gel fragments formed upon chewing. Gels with low values of fracture strain and fracture stress broke down into a large number of small fragments. These gels were perceived sweeter than gels with high values of fracture strain and fracture stress. Fracture strain had a larger impact on oral breakdown behavior and sweetness intensity than fracture stress. Results indicate that the oral breakdown behavior (i.e. formation of a large number of small fragments, which leads to an increase in the total surface area) is the driving factor for taste perception in semi-solid gels that have a heterogeneous distribution of sucrose. We suggest that the differences in sweetness intensity in gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers and differing in fracture properties result from differences in the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. An increase in the total surface area of fragments containing sucrose facilitates the release of tastants and increases the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. Consequently, the taste intensity of gels is enhanced.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-802
JournalFood Hydrocolloids
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

sweetness
mouth
Gels
gels
Food
stress fractures
Stress Fractures
Sugar (sucrose)
Sucrose
sucrose
surface area
Taste Perception
Mastication
mastication

Keywords

  • spatial-distribution
  • saltiness enhancement
  • sensory integration
  • perception
  • texture
  • release
  • bread
  • flavor
  • model
  • salt

Cite this

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title = "Taste enhancement in food gels: Effect of fracture properties on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity",
abstract = "This study investigates the effects of fracture strain and fracture stress on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity of semi-solid food gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers. The sweetness intensity of gels was mainly affected by the total surface area of gel fragments formed upon chewing. Gels with low values of fracture strain and fracture stress broke down into a large number of small fragments. These gels were perceived sweeter than gels with high values of fracture strain and fracture stress. Fracture strain had a larger impact on oral breakdown behavior and sweetness intensity than fracture stress. Results indicate that the oral breakdown behavior (i.e. formation of a large number of small fragments, which leads to an increase in the total surface area) is the driving factor for taste perception in semi-solid gels that have a heterogeneous distribution of sucrose. We suggest that the differences in sweetness intensity in gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers and differing in fracture properties result from differences in the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. An increase in the total surface area of fragments containing sucrose facilitates the release of tastants and increases the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. Consequently, the taste intensity of gels is enhanced.",
keywords = "spatial-distribution, saltiness enhancement, sensory integration, perception, texture, release, bread, flavor, model, salt",
author = "A.C. Mosca and {van de Velde}, F. and J.H.F. Bult and {van Boekel}, M.A.J.S. and M.A. Stieger",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.08.009",
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volume = "43",
pages = "794--802",
journal = "Food Hydrocolloids",
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Taste enhancement in food gels: Effect of fracture properties on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity. / Mosca, A.C.; van de Velde, F.; Bult, J.H.F.; van Boekel, M.A.J.S.; Stieger, M.A.

In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 43, 2015, p. 794-802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Taste enhancement in food gels: Effect of fracture properties on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity

AU - Mosca, A.C.

AU - van de Velde, F.

AU - Bult, J.H.F.

AU - van Boekel, M.A.J.S.

AU - Stieger, M.A.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This study investigates the effects of fracture strain and fracture stress on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity of semi-solid food gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers. The sweetness intensity of gels was mainly affected by the total surface area of gel fragments formed upon chewing. Gels with low values of fracture strain and fracture stress broke down into a large number of small fragments. These gels were perceived sweeter than gels with high values of fracture strain and fracture stress. Fracture strain had a larger impact on oral breakdown behavior and sweetness intensity than fracture stress. Results indicate that the oral breakdown behavior (i.e. formation of a large number of small fragments, which leads to an increase in the total surface area) is the driving factor for taste perception in semi-solid gels that have a heterogeneous distribution of sucrose. We suggest that the differences in sweetness intensity in gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers and differing in fracture properties result from differences in the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. An increase in the total surface area of fragments containing sucrose facilitates the release of tastants and increases the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. Consequently, the taste intensity of gels is enhanced.

AB - This study investigates the effects of fracture strain and fracture stress on oral breakdown, bolus formation and sweetness intensity of semi-solid food gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers. The sweetness intensity of gels was mainly affected by the total surface area of gel fragments formed upon chewing. Gels with low values of fracture strain and fracture stress broke down into a large number of small fragments. These gels were perceived sweeter than gels with high values of fracture strain and fracture stress. Fracture strain had a larger impact on oral breakdown behavior and sweetness intensity than fracture stress. Results indicate that the oral breakdown behavior (i.e. formation of a large number of small fragments, which leads to an increase in the total surface area) is the driving factor for taste perception in semi-solid gels that have a heterogeneous distribution of sucrose. We suggest that the differences in sweetness intensity in gels containing sucrose heterogeneously distributed in layers and differing in fracture properties result from differences in the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. An increase in the total surface area of fragments containing sucrose facilitates the release of tastants and increases the frequency of stimulation of taste receptors. Consequently, the taste intensity of gels is enhanced.

KW - spatial-distribution

KW - saltiness enhancement

KW - sensory integration

KW - perception

KW - texture

KW - release

KW - bread

KW - flavor

KW - model

KW - salt

U2 - 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.08.009

DO - 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2014.08.009

M3 - Article

VL - 43

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JO - Food Hydrocolloids

JF - Food Hydrocolloids

SN - 0268-005X

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