Swimming, grazing and social behaviour of rohu Labeo rohita (Hamilton) and common carp Cyprinus carpio (L.) in tanks under fed and non-fed conditions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fish behaviour was monitored in 1-m2 tanks each stocked with three 67-g rohu (Labeo rohita). In addition, 80-g common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were stocked at 0, 1 or 2 fish per tank. All tanks were fertilized prior to stocking to stimulate natural food production. In addition, half of the tanks were fed a supplemental diet. Results confirm the general view that rohu mainly lives and feeds in the water column, while common carp is a bottom feeder. In the presence of common carp, rohu increased the time spend grazing on tank wall and bottom, and decreasing grazing time in the water column. Supplemental feeding had a similar, be it less pronounced effect. When both present, rohu and common carp spend 47¿52% of their time together. Rohu spends more time close to the bottom in the presence of common carp than when no common carp is present, presumably to profit from increased zooplankton production, triggered by the resuspension of nutrients by burrowing common carp. This was reflected in a higher growth rate of rohu in the presence of carp. These effects were stronger with one common carp per tank than with two common carp. In this study, the results from behavioural observations in tanks nicely complemented results from a pond study analyzing growth, production and food availability. Behavioural observations in tank yielded useful additional information helpful to clarify species interactions and feeding ecology in polyculture ponds.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-264
JournalApplied Animal Behaviour Science
Volume113
Issue number1-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • periphyton-based culture
  • polyculture ponds
  • benthivorous fish
  • food
  • growth

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Swimming, grazing and social behaviour of rohu Labeo rohita (Hamilton) and common carp Cyprinus carpio (L.) in tanks under fed and non-fed conditions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this