Sweet preferences and sugar consumption of 4- and 5-year-old children: role of parents

D.G. Liem, M. Mars, C. de Graaf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors investigated the relationships in children between rules that restrict consumption of mono- and disaccharides (MDS), consumption of MDS and preferences for sucrose-containing orangeade. The background ideas of restriction rules we also investigated. To this end, 44 children (5.1±0.5 years) performed a rank-order and paired-comparison test of preference for five orangeades, which differed in sucrose concentration (0.14, 0.20, 0.29, 0.42, 0.61 M sucrose). Parents filled out a questionnaire concerning restriction rules and their children's consumption of MDS-containing foods. Stronger restriction rules were related to a lower consumption of beverages that contained MDS and to a lower consumption of MDS-containing foods during breakfast and lunch. The most freedom to choose foods that contain MDS was given during the afternoon. Fifty-five percent of the children who were highly restricted showed a preference for the highest concentration of sucrose in orangeade. None of these children preferred the orangeade with the lowest concentration of sucrose. While 19% of the children who were little restricted preferred the beverage with the lowest concentration of sucrose, 33% preferred the beverage with the highest concentration. These parents generally believed that sugar has a bad effect on health and had similar background ideas concerning restriction rules
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-245
JournalAppetite
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • food preferences
  • restricting access
  • childhood obesity
  • sour preferences
  • young-children
  • human infants
  • predictors
  • selection
  • behavior
  • taste

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