Supplementation of diet with non-digestible oligosaccharides alters the intestinal microbiota, but not arthritis development, in IL-1 receptor antagonist deficient mice

Rebecca Rogier, Thomas H.A. Ederveen, Harm Wopereis, Anita Hartog, Jos Boekhorst, Sacha A.F.T. Van Hijum, Jan Knol, Johan Garssen, Birgitte Walgreen, Monique M. Helsen, Peter M. Van Der Kraan, Peter L.E.M. Van Lent, Fons A.J. Van De Loo, Shahla Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Marije I. Koenders*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The intestinal microbiome is perturbed in patients with new-onset and chronic autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Recent studies in mouse models suggest that development and progression of autoimmune arthritis is highly affected by the intestinal microbiome. This makes modulation of the intestinal microbiota an interesting novel approach to suppress inflammatory arthritis. Prebiotics, defined as non-digestible carbohydrates that selectively stimulate the growth and activity of beneficial microorganisms, provide a relatively non-invasive approach to modulate the intestinal microbiota. The aim of this study was to assess the therapeutic potential of dietary supplementation with a prebiotic mixture of 90% short-chain galacto-oligosaccharides and 10% long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS) in experimental arthritis in mice. We here show that dietary supplementation with scGOS/ lcFOS has a pronounced effect on the composition of the fecal microbiota. Interestingly, the genera Enterococcus and Clostridium were markedly decreased by scGOS/lcFOS dietary supplementation. In contrast, the family Lachnospiraceae and the genus Lactobacillus, both associated with healthy microbiota, increased in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS diet. However, the scGOS/lcFOS induced alterations of the intestinal microbiota did not induce significant effects on the intestinal and systemic T helper cell subsets and were not sufficient to reproducibly suppress arthritis in mice. As expected, we did observe a significant increase in the bone mineral density in mice upon dietary supplementation with scGOS/lcFOS for 8 weeks. Altogether, this study suggests that dietary scGOS/lcFOS supplementation is able to promote presumably healthy gut microbiota and improve bone mineral density, but not inflammation, in arthritis-prone mice.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0219366
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2019

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    Rogier, R., Ederveen, T. H. A., Wopereis, H., Hartog, A., Boekhorst, J., Van Hijum, S. A. F. T., Knol, J., Garssen, J., Walgreen, B., Helsen, M. M., Van Der Kraan, P. M., Van Lent, P. L. E. M., Van De Loo, F. A. J., Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S., & Koenders, M. I. (2019). Supplementation of diet with non-digestible oligosaccharides alters the intestinal microbiota, but not arthritis development, in IL-1 receptor antagonist deficient mice. PLoS ONE, 14(7), [e0219366]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219366