Sulforaphane formation and bioaccessibility are more affected by steaming time than meal composition during in vitro digestion of broccoli

Irmela Sarvan-Kruse*, E. Kramer, Hans Bouwmeester, Matthijs Dekker, R. Verkerk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Broccoli is a rich source of the glucosinolate glucoraphanin (GR). After hydrolysis of GR by the endogenous enzyme myrosinase, sulforaphane (SF) or sulforaphane nitrile (SFN) are produced, depending on environmental conditions. How the conversion of GR and bioaccessibility of released breakdown products are affected by steaming (raw, 1 min, 2 min and 3 min steamed) and meal composition (protein or lipid addition) was studied with an in vitro digestion model (mouth, stomach, intestine, but not colonic digestion). The main formation of SF and SFN occurred during in vitro chewing. The contents of GR, SF and SFN did not change after further digestion, as the irreversible inactivated myrosinase under gastric conditions caused no further GR hydrolysis. SF concentrations were up to 10 times higher in raw and 1 min steamed broccoli samples after digestion compared to longer-steamed broccoli. Protein or lipid addition had no influence on the formation and bioaccessibility of SF or SFN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)580-586
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume214
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Enzymatic hydrolysis
  • Glucoraphanin
  • Myrosinase
  • Processing

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