Suitability of seven species of soil-inhabiting invertebrates for testing toxicity of pesticides in soil pore water

R. Ronday, N.W.H. Houx

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study assessed the suitability of seven species of soil invertebrates for toxicologically testing pesticides in water. Requirements were that the organisms must survive in water, be easy to handle, be easy to breed, be sensitive to pesticides, and show unambiguous toxicological effects. The organisms tested were the nematodes Plectus parietinus and Globodera rostochiensis, the white pot-worms Enchytraeus buchholzi and Enchytraeus albidus, the manure worm Eisenia fetida, the mite Caloglyphus mycophagus, and the springtail Folsomia candida. The springtail met all the requirements and proved to be the most suitable of the organisms tested for soil quality assessment with soil pore water.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)106-112
    JournalPedobiologia
    Volume40
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 1996

    Keywords

    • persistence
    • pesticide residues
    • pesticides
    • plant protection
    • soil solution
    • soil water
    • bioaccumulation
    • ecotoxicology

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