Sucrose and light effects on in vitro cultures of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) and Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia Nutt.) during low temperature storage

K. Pruski, T. Kozai, T. Lewis, T. Astatkie, J. Nowak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cultures of potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Atlantic, chokecherry ( Prunus virginiana L.) cv. Garrington and saskatoon berry (Amelancher alnifolia Nutt.) cv. Northline grown in vitro for 3 weeks at 24/22 °C, 16-h photoperiod, 150 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) mixed fluorescent/incandescent light were stored for 6, 9 and 12 weeks at 4 °C under 0 (darkness) and 3 μmol m-2 s-1 PPFD (690 nm red light continuous illumination). Growth regulators free MSMO medium either with or without 30 g l-1 sucrose was used to store the cultures. All cultures retained capacity to re-grow after storage. Tested factors, sucrose, light and the length of the storage period had an impact on shoot quality and re-growth capacity of the cultures. For either light treatment sucrose was essential for the low temperature maintenance of vigorous stock plants of potato, if stored for over 6 weeks. Chokecherry and saskatoon cultures stored well without sucrose; although chokecherry benefited from sucrose in the storage medium when the stock cultures were kept at the low temperature for 12 weeks. Low light significantly improved quality of the stored potato cultures, but had very little effect on both chokecherry and saskatoon berry cultures. The woody plant cultures grew during storage, and the longer the stock plants were stored, the more vigorous cultures they generated. The results indicate that growers can successfully use their existing facilities, small refrigerators and coolers with low light intensity, set at 4 °C, for short term storage of potato, chokecherry and saskatoon berry cultures. The potato cultures, which are known to be sensitive to prolonged low temperature storage, should be frequently monitored and subcultured as required. On the other hand, the woody plant stock cultures do not require any special attention when kept at 4 °C and re-grow the most vigorous shoots if stored for at least 12 weeks.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-221
JournalPlant Cell, Tissue and Organ Culture: an international journal on in vitro culture of higher plants
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sucrose and light effects on in vitro cultures of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), chokecherry (Prunus virginiana L.) and Saskatoon berry (Amelanchier alnifolia Nutt.) during low temperature storage'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this